Variation of the CD4, CD8, and MHC II cell population in granulomas of immunocompetent and immunosuppressed rabbits in Encephalitozoon cuniculi infection.

Variation of the CD4, CD8, and MHC II cell population in granulomas of immunocompetent and... Encephalitozoon cuniculi (E. cuniculi) is a fungi-related, obligate, zoonotic, spore-forming intracellular eukaryotic microorganism. This emerging pathogen causes granulomas in brain and kidneys of infected individuals. The objective of this study was to detect the distribution of CD4, CD8 and MHCII-positive cells within granulomas in these organs in infected immunocompetent (group A) and infected immunosuppressed (group B) New Zealand white rabbits using immunohistochemistry. In brain, labeled CD4 immune cells were mainly located in the periphery of granulomas in group B. Kidneys of groups A and B, displayed CD4-positive in granulomas and were significant different when compared to brain. CD8 immune cells in brain and kidneys were disseminated in the granulomas in groups A and B; however, no significant difference was observed. MHCII-positive cells were more numerous in brain sections of group B and were significantly different when compared to kidney sections. Granulomas were not observed in control animals of group C and D. In conclusion, we identified CD4-positive cells in both the brain and kidneys of immunocompetent and immunosuppressed animals; CD8-positive cells were more numerous in brain of immunosuppressed rabbits and MHCII cells were more predominant in brain of immunocompetent rabbits. Apparently, the immunosuppression stimulated a change in the cellular phenotype of Th1- to Th2-like granulomas in brain and kidneys by an unknown mechanism. These results increase our understanding of CD4, CD8 and MHCII positive cells within the E. cuniculi granuloma microenvironment and will help in future microsporidian granulomas studies of both immunocompetent and immunosuppressed individuals. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative immunology, microbiology and infectious diseases Pubmed

Variation of the CD4, CD8, and MHC II cell population in granulomas of immunocompetent and immunosuppressed rabbits in Encephalitozoon cuniculi infection.

Preview Only

Variation of the CD4, CD8, and MHC II cell population in granulomas of immunocompetent and immunosuppressed rabbits in Encephalitozoon cuniculi infection.

Comparative immunology, microbiology and infectious diseases, Volume 68: 1 – Jan 3, 2020

Abstract

Encephalitozoon cuniculi (E. cuniculi) is a fungi-related, obligate, zoonotic, spore-forming intracellular eukaryotic microorganism. This emerging pathogen causes granulomas in brain and kidneys of infected individuals. The objective of this study was to detect the distribution of CD4, CD8 and MHCII-positive cells within granulomas in these organs in infected immunocompetent (group A) and infected immunosuppressed (group B) New Zealand white rabbits using immunohistochemistry. In brain, labeled CD4 immune cells were mainly located in the periphery of granulomas in group B. Kidneys of groups A and B, displayed CD4-positive in granulomas and were significant different when compared to brain. CD8 immune cells in brain and kidneys were disseminated in the granulomas in groups A and B; however, no significant difference was observed. MHCII-positive cells were more numerous in brain sections of group B and were significantly different when compared to kidney sections. Granulomas were not observed in control animals of group C and D. In conclusion, we identified CD4-positive cells in both the brain and kidneys of immunocompetent and immunosuppressed animals; CD8-positive cells were more numerous in brain of immunosuppressed rabbits and MHCII cells were more predominant in brain of immunocompetent rabbits. Apparently, the immunosuppression stimulated a change in the cellular phenotype of Th1- to Th2-like granulomas in brain and kidneys by an unknown mechanism. These results increase our understanding of CD4, CD8 and MHCII positive cells within the E. cuniculi granuloma microenvironment and will help in future microsporidian granulomas studies of both immunocompetent and immunosuppressed individuals.
Loading next page...
 
/lp/pubmed/variation-of-the-cd4-cd8-and-mhc-ii-cell-population-in-granulomas-of-gi0Rqg7tkX
DOI
10.1016/j.cimid.2019.101387

Abstract

Encephalitozoon cuniculi (E. cuniculi) is a fungi-related, obligate, zoonotic, spore-forming intracellular eukaryotic microorganism. This emerging pathogen causes granulomas in brain and kidneys of infected individuals. The objective of this study was to detect the distribution of CD4, CD8 and MHCII-positive cells within granulomas in these organs in infected immunocompetent (group A) and infected immunosuppressed (group B) New Zealand white rabbits using immunohistochemistry. In brain, labeled CD4 immune cells were mainly located in the periphery of granulomas in group B. Kidneys of groups A and B, displayed CD4-positive in granulomas and were significant different when compared to brain. CD8 immune cells in brain and kidneys were disseminated in the granulomas in groups A and B; however, no significant difference was observed. MHCII-positive cells were more numerous in brain sections of group B and were significantly different when compared to kidney sections. Granulomas were not observed in control animals of group C and D. In conclusion, we identified CD4-positive cells in both the brain and kidneys of immunocompetent and immunosuppressed animals; CD8-positive cells were more numerous in brain of immunosuppressed rabbits and MHCII cells were more predominant in brain of immunocompetent rabbits. Apparently, the immunosuppression stimulated a change in the cellular phenotype of Th1- to Th2-like granulomas in brain and kidneys by an unknown mechanism. These results increase our understanding of CD4, CD8 and MHCII positive cells within the E. cuniculi granuloma microenvironment and will help in future microsporidian granulomas studies of both immunocompetent and immunosuppressed individuals.

Journal

Comparative immunology, microbiology and infectious diseasesPubmed

Published: Jan 3, 2020

There are no references for this article.

Sorry, we don’t have permission to share this article on DeepDyve,
but here are related articles that you can start reading right now:

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off