Telemedicine for Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in Sleep Apnea. A Randomized, Controlled Study.

Telemedicine for Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in Sleep Apnea. A Randomized, Controlled Study. Rationale: Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the standard treatment for the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), but long-term adherence remains a challenge. In a pilot study, we observed that telemedicine combined with telemetrically triggered interventions was associated with improved CPAP adherence in the first month of treatment.Objectives: In the current randomized, controlled phase III trial, we aimed to collect pivotal data for the use of telemedicine in CPAP treatment of patients with OSAS.Methods: Symptomatic patients with OSAS were randomized to a telemedicine or control arm and initiated CPAP treatment. Phone calls were triggered in the telemedicine group during the first month of treatment upon either poor use or excessive mask leakage. Patients were followed for 6 months. Measures of CPAP use at 6 months were the main study endpoints.Results: Among 240 patients enrolled, 71 (30%) discontinued CPAP treatment over the course of the study. The primary outcome measure, the proportion of nights with CPAP use greater than 1 hour, was not statistically different in the telemedicine group (92.0%) versus the control group (88.2%) (P = 0.565). The daily hours of CPAP use at 6 months also did not differ significantly between the telemedicine group (5.6 h) and the control group (4.8 h) (P = 0.663). However, in a post hoc analysis, telemedicine led to increased device use in a subgroup of patients with a mild form of disease (5.6 h vs. 3.4 h; P = 0.026). The telemedicine-based intervention had a positive impact on sleep-related quality of life as measured with the Quebec Sleep Questionnaire (5.55 vs. 5.49 at 1 mo [P = 0.020]; 5.61 vs. 5.46 at 6 mo [P = 0.013]).Conclusions: A telemetrically triggered intervention in the first month of treatment did not improve CPAP use in the study population overall, but it had positive effects in patients with a mild form of OSAS and led to an improvement in sleep-related quality of life.Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01715194). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annals of the American Thoracic Society Pubmed

Telemedicine for Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in Sleep Apnea. A Randomized, Controlled Study.

Annals of the American Thoracic Society, Volume 16 (12): 8 – Nov 27, 2019
Preview Only

Telemedicine for Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in Sleep Apnea. A Randomized, Controlled Study.

Annals of the American Thoracic Society, Volume 16 (12): 8 – Nov 27, 2019

Abstract

Rationale: Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the standard treatment for the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), but long-term adherence remains a challenge. In a pilot study, we observed that telemedicine combined with telemetrically triggered interventions was associated with improved CPAP adherence in the first month of treatment.Objectives: In the current randomized, controlled phase III trial, we aimed to collect pivotal data for the use of telemedicine in CPAP treatment of patients with OSAS.Methods: Symptomatic patients with OSAS were randomized to a telemedicine or control arm and initiated CPAP treatment. Phone calls were triggered in the telemedicine group during the first month of treatment upon either poor use or excessive mask leakage. Patients were followed for 6 months. Measures of CPAP use at 6 months were the main study endpoints.Results: Among 240 patients enrolled, 71 (30%) discontinued CPAP treatment over the course of the study. The primary outcome measure, the proportion of nights with CPAP use greater than 1 hour, was not statistically different in the telemedicine group (92.0%) versus the control group (88.2%) (P = 0.565). The daily hours of CPAP use at 6 months also did not differ significantly between the telemedicine group (5.6 h) and the control group (4.8 h) (P = 0.663). However, in a post hoc analysis, telemedicine led to increased device use in a subgroup of patients with a mild form of disease (5.6 h vs. 3.4 h; P = 0.026). The telemedicine-based intervention had a positive impact on sleep-related quality of life as measured with the Quebec Sleep Questionnaire (5.55 vs. 5.49 at 1 mo [P = 0.020]; 5.61 vs. 5.46 at 6 mo [P = 0.013]).Conclusions: A telemetrically triggered intervention in the first month of treatment did not improve CPAP use in the study population overall, but it had positive effects in patients with a mild form of OSAS and led to an improvement in sleep-related quality of life.Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01715194).
Loading next page...
 
/lp/pubmed/telemedicine-for-continuous-positive-airway-pressure-in-sleep-apnea-a-XltewjQ2bR
DOI
10.1513/AnnalsATS.201901-013OC
pmid
31310575

Abstract

Rationale: Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the standard treatment for the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), but long-term adherence remains a challenge. In a pilot study, we observed that telemedicine combined with telemetrically triggered interventions was associated with improved CPAP adherence in the first month of treatment.Objectives: In the current randomized, controlled phase III trial, we aimed to collect pivotal data for the use of telemedicine in CPAP treatment of patients with OSAS.Methods: Symptomatic patients with OSAS were randomized to a telemedicine or control arm and initiated CPAP treatment. Phone calls were triggered in the telemedicine group during the first month of treatment upon either poor use or excessive mask leakage. Patients were followed for 6 months. Measures of CPAP use at 6 months were the main study endpoints.Results: Among 240 patients enrolled, 71 (30%) discontinued CPAP treatment over the course of the study. The primary outcome measure, the proportion of nights with CPAP use greater than 1 hour, was not statistically different in the telemedicine group (92.0%) versus the control group (88.2%) (P = 0.565). The daily hours of CPAP use at 6 months also did not differ significantly between the telemedicine group (5.6 h) and the control group (4.8 h) (P = 0.663). However, in a post hoc analysis, telemedicine led to increased device use in a subgroup of patients with a mild form of disease (5.6 h vs. 3.4 h; P = 0.026). The telemedicine-based intervention had a positive impact on sleep-related quality of life as measured with the Quebec Sleep Questionnaire (5.55 vs. 5.49 at 1 mo [P = 0.020]; 5.61 vs. 5.46 at 6 mo [P = 0.013]).Conclusions: A telemetrically triggered intervention in the first month of treatment did not improve CPAP use in the study population overall, but it had positive effects in patients with a mild form of OSAS and led to an improvement in sleep-related quality of life.Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01715194).

Journal

Annals of the American Thoracic SocietyPubmed

Published: Nov 27, 2019

There are no references for this article.

Sorry, we don’t have permission to share this article on DeepDyve,
but here are related articles that you can start reading right now:

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off