Sulfate assimilation regulates hydrogen sulfide production independent of lifespan and reactive oxygen species under methionine restriction condition in yeast.

Sulfate assimilation regulates hydrogen sulfide production independent of lifespan and reactive... Endogenously produced hydrogen sulfide was proposed to be an underlying mechanism of lifespan extension via methionine restriction. However, hydrogen sulfide regulation and its beneficial effects via methionine restriction remain elusive. Here, we identified the genes required to increase hydrogen sulfide production under methionine restriction condition using genome-wide high-throughput screening in yeast strains with single-gene deletions. Sulfate assimilation-related genes, such as MET1, MET3, MET5, and MET10, were found to be particularly crucial for hydrogen sulfide production. Interestingly, methionine restriction failed to increase hydrogen sulfide production in mutant strains; however, it successfully extended chronological lifespan and reduced reactive oxygen species levels. Altogether, our observations suggested that increased hydrogen sulfide production via methionine restriction is not the mechanism underlying extended yeast lifespan, even though increased hydrogen sulfide production occurred simultaneously with yeast lifespan extension under methionine restriction condition. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aging Pubmed

Sulfate assimilation regulates hydrogen sulfide production independent of lifespan and reactive oxygen species under methionine restriction condition in yeast.

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Sulfate assimilation regulates hydrogen sulfide production independent of lifespan and reactive oxygen species under methionine restriction condition in yeast.

Aging, Volume 11 (12): 20 – Jul 19, 2019

Abstract

Endogenously produced hydrogen sulfide was proposed to be an underlying mechanism of lifespan extension via methionine restriction. However, hydrogen sulfide regulation and its beneficial effects via methionine restriction remain elusive. Here, we identified the genes required to increase hydrogen sulfide production under methionine restriction condition using genome-wide high-throughput screening in yeast strains with single-gene deletions. Sulfate assimilation-related genes, such as MET1, MET3, MET5, and MET10, were found to be particularly crucial for hydrogen sulfide production. Interestingly, methionine restriction failed to increase hydrogen sulfide production in mutant strains; however, it successfully extended chronological lifespan and reduced reactive oxygen species levels. Altogether, our observations suggested that increased hydrogen sulfide production via methionine restriction is not the mechanism underlying extended yeast lifespan, even though increased hydrogen sulfide production occurred simultaneously with yeast lifespan extension under methionine restriction condition.
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DOI
10.18632/aging.102050

Abstract

Endogenously produced hydrogen sulfide was proposed to be an underlying mechanism of lifespan extension via methionine restriction. However, hydrogen sulfide regulation and its beneficial effects via methionine restriction remain elusive. Here, we identified the genes required to increase hydrogen sulfide production under methionine restriction condition using genome-wide high-throughput screening in yeast strains with single-gene deletions. Sulfate assimilation-related genes, such as MET1, MET3, MET5, and MET10, were found to be particularly crucial for hydrogen sulfide production. Interestingly, methionine restriction failed to increase hydrogen sulfide production in mutant strains; however, it successfully extended chronological lifespan and reduced reactive oxygen species levels. Altogether, our observations suggested that increased hydrogen sulfide production via methionine restriction is not the mechanism underlying extended yeast lifespan, even though increased hydrogen sulfide production occurred simultaneously with yeast lifespan extension under methionine restriction condition.

Journal

AgingPubmed

Published: Jul 19, 2019

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