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Human-resource professionals' perceptions of organizational politics as a function of experience, organizational size, and perceived independence.

Human-resource professionals' perceptions of organizational politics as a function of experience,... The author examined human-resource professionals' occupation-related and general work experience, socialization from participation in professional activities, organizational size, and perceived independence as predictors of perceptions of organizational politics (POPS). Results varied with the author's use of the overall POPS scale (K. M. Kacmar & G. R. Ferris, 1991) vs. a more specific subscale that measured perceptions related to such issues as pay- and promotion-related politics. It was most notable that work experience appeared to have an inverse relationship with POPS among human-resource professionals in the area of pay and promotions. The author discussed results in relation to the implications and directions for future research. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of social psychology Pubmed

Human-resource professionals' perceptions of organizational politics as a function of experience, organizational size, and perceived independence.

The Journal of social psychology , Volume 146 (6): 16 – Jan 23, 2007

Human-resource professionals' perceptions of organizational politics as a function of experience, organizational size, and perceived independence.


Abstract

The author examined human-resource professionals' occupation-related and general work experience, socialization from participation in professional activities, organizational size, and perceived independence as predictors of perceptions of organizational politics (POPS). Results varied with the author's use of the overall POPS scale (K. M. Kacmar & G. R. Ferris, 1991) vs. a more specific subscale that measured perceptions related to such issues as pay- and promotion-related politics. It was most notable that work experience appeared to have an inverse relationship with POPS among human-resource professionals in the area of pay and promotions. The author discussed results in relation to the implications and directions for future research.

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ISSN
0022-4545
DOI
10.3200/SOCP.146.6.717-732
pmid
17172147

Abstract

The author examined human-resource professionals' occupation-related and general work experience, socialization from participation in professional activities, organizational size, and perceived independence as predictors of perceptions of organizational politics (POPS). Results varied with the author's use of the overall POPS scale (K. M. Kacmar & G. R. Ferris, 1991) vs. a more specific subscale that measured perceptions related to such issues as pay- and promotion-related politics. It was most notable that work experience appeared to have an inverse relationship with POPS among human-resource professionals in the area of pay and promotions. The author discussed results in relation to the implications and directions for future research.

Journal

The Journal of social psychologyPubmed

Published: Jan 23, 2007

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