Development and Validation of a Bovine Castration Model and Rubric.

Development and Validation of a Bovine Castration Model and Rubric. Veterinary students require deliberate practice to reach competence in surgical bovine castration, but animal availability limits opportunities for practice. We sought to create and validate a surgical bovine castration model consisting of a molded silicone scrotum and testicles to allow students to practice this skill without the use of live animals. We sought to validate the model and associated scoring rubric for use in a veterinary clinical skills course. A convenience sample of third-year veterinary students (n = 19) who had never castrated a bovine were randomized into two groups. The traditionally trained (T) group performed castration on a live bull calf after a 50-minute instructional lecture. The model-trained (M) group received the same lecture and a 2-hour clinical skills session practicing bovine castration using the model. All students were subsequently digitally recorded while castrating a live bull calf. Performance recordings were scored by an investigator blinded to group. Survey data were collected from the students and from expert veterinarians testing the model (n = 8). Feedback from both groups was positive. The M group had higher performance scores than the T group (M group, M = 80.6; T group, M = 68.2; p = .005). Reliability of rubric scores was adequate at .74. No difference was found in surgical time (M group, M = 4.5 min; T group, M = 5.5 min; p = .12). Survey feedback indicated that experts and students considered the model useful. Model training improved students' performance scores and provided evidence for validation of the model and rubric. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of veterinary medical education Pubmed

Development and Validation of a Bovine Castration Model and Rubric.

Preview Only

Development and Validation of a Bovine Castration Model and Rubric.

Journal of veterinary medical educationFeb 13, 2020

Abstract

Veterinary students require deliberate practice to reach competence in surgical bovine castration, but animal availability limits opportunities for practice. We sought to create and validate a surgical bovine castration model consisting of a molded silicone scrotum and testicles to allow students to practice this skill without the use of live animals. We sought to validate the model and associated scoring rubric for use in a veterinary clinical skills course. A convenience sample of third-year veterinary students (n = 19) who had never castrated a bovine were randomized into two groups. The traditionally trained (T) group performed castration on a live bull calf after a 50-minute instructional lecture. The model-trained (M) group received the same lecture and a 2-hour clinical skills session practicing bovine castration using the model. All students were subsequently digitally recorded while castrating a live bull calf. Performance recordings were scored by an investigator blinded to group. Survey data were collected from the students and from expert veterinarians testing the model (n = 8). Feedback from both groups was positive. The M group had higher performance scores than the T group (M group, M = 80.6; T group, M = 68.2; p = .005). Reliability of rubric scores was adequate at .74. No difference was found in surgical time (M group, M = 4.5 min; T group, M = 5.5 min; p = .12). Survey feedback indicated that experts and students considered the model useful. Model training improved students' performance scores and provided evidence for validation of the model and rubric.
Loading next page...
 
/lp/pubmed/development-and-validation-of-a-bovine-castration-model-and-rubric-Wg5FG7vyBM
ISSN
0748-321X
DOI
10.3138/jvme.2018-0016
pmid
32053049

Abstract

Veterinary students require deliberate practice to reach competence in surgical bovine castration, but animal availability limits opportunities for practice. We sought to create and validate a surgical bovine castration model consisting of a molded silicone scrotum and testicles to allow students to practice this skill without the use of live animals. We sought to validate the model and associated scoring rubric for use in a veterinary clinical skills course. A convenience sample of third-year veterinary students (n = 19) who had never castrated a bovine were randomized into two groups. The traditionally trained (T) group performed castration on a live bull calf after a 50-minute instructional lecture. The model-trained (M) group received the same lecture and a 2-hour clinical skills session practicing bovine castration using the model. All students were subsequently digitally recorded while castrating a live bull calf. Performance recordings were scored by an investigator blinded to group. Survey data were collected from the students and from expert veterinarians testing the model (n = 8). Feedback from both groups was positive. The M group had higher performance scores than the T group (M group, M = 80.6; T group, M = 68.2; p = .005). Reliability of rubric scores was adequate at .74. No difference was found in surgical time (M group, M = 4.5 min; T group, M = 5.5 min; p = .12). Survey feedback indicated that experts and students considered the model useful. Model training improved students' performance scores and provided evidence for validation of the model and rubric.

Journal

Journal of veterinary medical educationPubmed

Published: Feb 13, 2020

There are no references for this article.

Sorry, we don’t have permission to share this article on DeepDyve,
but here are related articles that you can start reading right now:

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off