Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Bone mineral content and growth in very-low-birth-weight premature infants. Does bronchopulmonary dysplasia make a difference?

Bone mineral content and growth in very-low-birth-weight premature infants. Does bronchopulmonary... It is reported that very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants with the complication of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) are at high risk for metabolic bone disease and growth retardation. In a prospective study, we compared growth and bone mineral content (BMC) during the first year of life in 16 VLBW infants with BPD and 16 VLBW control infants. The BPD and control groups were matched for gestational age (28.2 +/- 0.8 vs 28.4 +/- 1.2 weeks) and birth weight (986 +/- 158 vs 1037 +/- 147 g). Calcium, phosphorus, vitamin D, and energy intakes did not differ during the initial 60-day period of hospitalization. At 1 year of age, there were no significant differences in BMC (104.4 +/- 21.4 vs 109.7 +/- 19.2 mg/cm), weight (7440 +/- 1090 vs 7420 +/- 826 g), length (66.9 +/- 3.4 vs 67.7 +/- 3.0 cm), or head circumference (45.1 +/- 1.5 vs 44.0 +/- 1.0 cm) between BPD and control groups. In both groups bone mineralization was delayed compared to the intrauterine curve for BMC. Growth was also delayed compared to the growth curves of Babson for premature infants during the first year of life. We conclude that for our study population, factors other than the presence or absence of BPD are responsible for marked delays in bone mineralization and growth in VLBW premature infants. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children (1960) Pubmed

Bone mineral content and growth in very-low-birth-weight premature infants. Does bronchopulmonary dysplasia make a difference?

American journal of diseases of children (1960) , Volume 141 (2): 5 – Feb 27, 1987

Bone mineral content and growth in very-low-birth-weight premature infants. Does bronchopulmonary dysplasia make a difference?


Abstract

It is reported that very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants with the complication of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) are at high risk for metabolic bone disease and growth retardation. In a prospective study, we compared growth and bone mineral content (BMC) during the first year of life in 16 VLBW infants with BPD and 16 VLBW control infants. The BPD and control groups were matched for gestational age (28.2 +/- 0.8 vs 28.4 +/- 1.2 weeks) and birth weight (986 +/- 158 vs 1037 +/- 147 g). Calcium, phosphorus, vitamin D, and energy intakes did not differ during the initial 60-day period of hospitalization. At 1 year of age, there were no significant differences in BMC (104.4 +/- 21.4 vs 109.7 +/- 19.2 mg/cm), weight (7440 +/- 1090 vs 7420 +/- 826 g), length (66.9 +/- 3.4 vs 67.7 +/- 3.0 cm), or head circumference (45.1 +/- 1.5 vs 44.0 +/- 1.0 cm) between BPD and control groups. In both groups bone mineralization was delayed compared to the intrauterine curve for BMC. Growth was also delayed compared to the growth curves of Babson for premature infants during the first year of life. We conclude that for our study population, factors other than the presence or absence of BPD are responsible for marked delays in bone mineralization and growth in VLBW premature infants.

Loading next page...
 
/lp/pubmed/bone-mineral-content-and-growth-in-very-low-birth-weight-premature-T0cv0ul8Wv
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1987.04460020069029
pmid
3812385

Abstract

It is reported that very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants with the complication of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) are at high risk for metabolic bone disease and growth retardation. In a prospective study, we compared growth and bone mineral content (BMC) during the first year of life in 16 VLBW infants with BPD and 16 VLBW control infants. The BPD and control groups were matched for gestational age (28.2 +/- 0.8 vs 28.4 +/- 1.2 weeks) and birth weight (986 +/- 158 vs 1037 +/- 147 g). Calcium, phosphorus, vitamin D, and energy intakes did not differ during the initial 60-day period of hospitalization. At 1 year of age, there were no significant differences in BMC (104.4 +/- 21.4 vs 109.7 +/- 19.2 mg/cm), weight (7440 +/- 1090 vs 7420 +/- 826 g), length (66.9 +/- 3.4 vs 67.7 +/- 3.0 cm), or head circumference (45.1 +/- 1.5 vs 44.0 +/- 1.0 cm) between BPD and control groups. In both groups bone mineralization was delayed compared to the intrauterine curve for BMC. Growth was also delayed compared to the growth curves of Babson for premature infants during the first year of life. We conclude that for our study population, factors other than the presence or absence of BPD are responsible for marked delays in bone mineralization and growth in VLBW premature infants.

Journal

American journal of diseases of children (1960)Pubmed

Published: Feb 27, 1987

There are no references for this article.

Sorry, we don’t have permission to show this article on DeepDyve,
but here are related articles that you can start reading right now:

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$499/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month