Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Atomic-level observation of disclination dipoles in mechanically milled, nanocrystalline Fe.

Atomic-level observation of disclination dipoles in mechanically milled, nanocrystalline Fe. Plastic deformation of materials occurs by the motion of defects known as dislocations and disclinations. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy was used to directly reveal the individual dislocations that constitute partial disclination dipoles in nanocrystalline, body-centered cubic iron that had undergone severe plastic deformation by mechanical milling. The mechanisms by which the formation and migration of such partial disclination dipoles during deformation allow crystalline solids to fragment and rotate at the nanometer level are described. Such rearrangements are important basic phenomena that occur during material deformation, and hence, they may be critical in the formation of nanocrystalline metals by mechanical milling and other deformation processes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Science (New York, N.Y.) Pubmed

Atomic-level observation of disclination dipoles in mechanically milled, nanocrystalline Fe.

Science (New York, N.Y.) , Volume 295 (5564): -2427 – Apr 22, 2002

Atomic-level observation of disclination dipoles in mechanically milled, nanocrystalline Fe.


Abstract

Plastic deformation of materials occurs by the motion of defects known as dislocations and disclinations. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy was used to directly reveal the individual dislocations that constitute partial disclination dipoles in nanocrystalline, body-centered cubic iron that had undergone severe plastic deformation by mechanical milling. The mechanisms by which the formation and migration of such partial disclination dipoles during deformation allow crystalline solids to fragment and rotate at the nanometer level are described. Such rearrangements are important basic phenomena that occur during material deformation, and hence, they may be critical in the formation of nanocrystalline metals by mechanical milling and other deformation processes.

Loading next page...
 
/lp/pubmed/atomic-level-observation-of-disclination-dipoles-in-mechanically-Cj31gTkOgW

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

ISSN
0036-8075
DOI
10.1126/science.1067430
pmid
11923534

Abstract

Plastic deformation of materials occurs by the motion of defects known as dislocations and disclinations. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy was used to directly reveal the individual dislocations that constitute partial disclination dipoles in nanocrystalline, body-centered cubic iron that had undergone severe plastic deformation by mechanical milling. The mechanisms by which the formation and migration of such partial disclination dipoles during deformation allow crystalline solids to fragment and rotate at the nanometer level are described. Such rearrangements are important basic phenomena that occur during material deformation, and hence, they may be critical in the formation of nanocrystalline metals by mechanical milling and other deformation processes.

Journal

Science (New York, N.Y.)Pubmed

Published: Apr 22, 2002

There are no references for this article.