Association between asymmetry in lower extremity lean mass and functional mobility in older adults living in the community: Results from the Korean Frailty and Aging Cohort Study.

Association between asymmetry in lower extremity lean mass and functional mobility in older... The asymmetry in lower extremity strength is known to be related to the functional mobility in older adults living in the community. However, little is known about the association between lower extremity lean mass asymmetry and functional mobility in this patient group. Hence, this study aimed to determine whether asymmetry in lower extremity muscle mass has a significant relationship with functional mobility in older adults living in the community.This cross-sectional study analyzed the pre-existing data from the Korean Frailty and Aging Cohort Study. A total of 435 older people (aged 70-84 years) were divided into the following groups according to their Limb Asymmetry Index (LAsI): low, intermediate, and high asymmetric groups. LAsI is calculated using lower extremity lean mass, and comparisons between groups were conducted. The participants were also further divided into better and worse mobility groups based on their physical performance test results (Timed Up and Go and Short Physical Performance Battery), and comparisons between groups were conducted. Comparisons between fallers and non-fallers were also conducted. In addition, this study investigated the factors that had a significant effect on gait speed and fall experience within the past year among older adults living in the community.The LAsI was significantly associated with gait speed in older adults living in the community. Older adults in the highest tertile of the LAsI had a slower gait speed than those in the lowest tertile of the LAsI. However, no significant difference was observed in the LAsI between the better mobility group and worse mobility group. Moreover, the LAsI was not a significant predictor of falls.Asymmetry in lower extremity lean mass was significantly associated with gait speed in older adults living in the community. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Medicine Pubmed

Association between asymmetry in lower extremity lean mass and functional mobility in older adults living in the community: Results from the Korean Frailty and Aging Cohort Study.

Medicine, Volume 98 (45): -1788199999 – Nov 25, 2019
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Association between asymmetry in lower extremity lean mass and functional mobility in older adults living in the community: Results from the Korean Frailty and Aging Cohort Study.

Medicine, Volume 98 (45): -1788199999 – Nov 25, 2019

Abstract

The asymmetry in lower extremity strength is known to be related to the functional mobility in older adults living in the community. However, little is known about the association between lower extremity lean mass asymmetry and functional mobility in this patient group. Hence, this study aimed to determine whether asymmetry in lower extremity muscle mass has a significant relationship with functional mobility in older adults living in the community.This cross-sectional study analyzed the pre-existing data from the Korean Frailty and Aging Cohort Study. A total of 435 older people (aged 70-84 years) were divided into the following groups according to their Limb Asymmetry Index (LAsI): low, intermediate, and high asymmetric groups. LAsI is calculated using lower extremity lean mass, and comparisons between groups were conducted. The participants were also further divided into better and worse mobility groups based on their physical performance test results (Timed Up and Go and Short Physical Performance Battery), and comparisons between groups were conducted. Comparisons between fallers and non-fallers were also conducted. In addition, this study investigated the factors that had a significant effect on gait speed and fall experience within the past year among older adults living in the community.The LAsI was significantly associated with gait speed in older adults living in the community. Older adults in the highest tertile of the LAsI had a slower gait speed than those in the lowest tertile of the LAsI. However, no significant difference was observed in the LAsI between the better mobility group and worse mobility group. Moreover, the LAsI was not a significant predictor of falls.Asymmetry in lower extremity lean mass was significantly associated with gait speed in older adults living in the community.
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DOI
10.1097/MD.0000000000017882

Abstract

The asymmetry in lower extremity strength is known to be related to the functional mobility in older adults living in the community. However, little is known about the association between lower extremity lean mass asymmetry and functional mobility in this patient group. Hence, this study aimed to determine whether asymmetry in lower extremity muscle mass has a significant relationship with functional mobility in older adults living in the community.This cross-sectional study analyzed the pre-existing data from the Korean Frailty and Aging Cohort Study. A total of 435 older people (aged 70-84 years) were divided into the following groups according to their Limb Asymmetry Index (LAsI): low, intermediate, and high asymmetric groups. LAsI is calculated using lower extremity lean mass, and comparisons between groups were conducted. The participants were also further divided into better and worse mobility groups based on their physical performance test results (Timed Up and Go and Short Physical Performance Battery), and comparisons between groups were conducted. Comparisons between fallers and non-fallers were also conducted. In addition, this study investigated the factors that had a significant effect on gait speed and fall experience within the past year among older adults living in the community.The LAsI was significantly associated with gait speed in older adults living in the community. Older adults in the highest tertile of the LAsI had a slower gait speed than those in the lowest tertile of the LAsI. However, no significant difference was observed in the LAsI between the better mobility group and worse mobility group. Moreover, the LAsI was not a significant predictor of falls.Asymmetry in lower extremity lean mass was significantly associated with gait speed in older adults living in the community.

Journal

MedicinePubmed

Published: Nov 25, 2019

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