Activity of native tick kinins and peptidomimetics on the cognate target G protein-coupled receptor from the cattle fever tick, Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

Activity of native tick kinins and peptidomimetics on the cognate target G protein-coupled... Kinins are multifunctional neuropeptides that regulate key insect physiological processes such as diuresis, feeding, and ecdysis. However, the physiological roles of kinins in ticks are unclear. Furthermore, ticks have an expanded number of kinin paracopies in the kinin gene. Silencing the kinin receptor (KR) in females of Rhipicephalus microplus reduces reproductive fitness. Thus, it appears the kinin signaling system is important for tick physiology and its disruption may have potential for tick control. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pest management science Pubmed

Activity of native tick kinins and peptidomimetics on the cognate target G protein-coupled receptor from the cattle fever tick, Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

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Activity of native tick kinins and peptidomimetics on the cognate target G protein-coupled receptor from the cattle fever tick, Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

Pest management science: 1 – Jan 8, 2020

Abstract

Kinins are multifunctional neuropeptides that regulate key insect physiological processes such as diuresis, feeding, and ecdysis. However, the physiological roles of kinins in ticks are unclear. Furthermore, ticks have an expanded number of kinin paracopies in the kinin gene. Silencing the kinin receptor (KR) in females of Rhipicephalus microplus reduces reproductive fitness. Thus, it appears the kinin signaling system is important for tick physiology and its disruption may have potential for tick control.
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DOI
10.1002/ps.5704

Abstract

Kinins are multifunctional neuropeptides that regulate key insect physiological processes such as diuresis, feeding, and ecdysis. However, the physiological roles of kinins in ticks are unclear. Furthermore, ticks have an expanded number of kinin paracopies in the kinin gene. Silencing the kinin receptor (KR) in females of Rhipicephalus microplus reduces reproductive fitness. Thus, it appears the kinin signaling system is important for tick physiology and its disruption may have potential for tick control.

Journal

Pest management sciencePubmed

Published: Jan 8, 2020

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