Acrolein contributes to urothelial carcinomas in patients with chronic kidney disease.

Acrolein contributes to urothelial carcinomas in patients with chronic kidney disease. Urothelial carcinomas (UCs) are highly prevalent in patients with end-stage renal disease. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is the predecessor of end-stage renal disease, and it is also associated with UC. However, the interplay between CKD and UC lacks solid evidence. Acrolein is produced by polyamines and has been suggested to be the uremic "toxin." The level of acrolein correlates well with chronic renal failure. We recently found that acrolein-induced DNA damage and inhibited DNA repair in urothelial cells, which contribute to bladder cancer. Therefore, we hypothesize that acrolein is involved in the formation of UC in patients with CKD. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Urologic oncology Pubmed

Acrolein contributes to urothelial carcinomas in patients with chronic kidney disease.

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Acrolein contributes to urothelial carcinomas in patients with chronic kidney disease.

Urologic oncology, Volume 38 (5): 11 – May 15, 2020

Abstract

Urothelial carcinomas (UCs) are highly prevalent in patients with end-stage renal disease. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is the predecessor of end-stage renal disease, and it is also associated with UC. However, the interplay between CKD and UC lacks solid evidence. Acrolein is produced by polyamines and has been suggested to be the uremic "toxin." The level of acrolein correlates well with chronic renal failure. We recently found that acrolein-induced DNA damage and inhibited DNA repair in urothelial cells, which contribute to bladder cancer. Therefore, we hypothesize that acrolein is involved in the formation of UC in patients with CKD.
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DOI
10.1016/j.urolonc.2020.02.017
pmid
32199754

Abstract

Urothelial carcinomas (UCs) are highly prevalent in patients with end-stage renal disease. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is the predecessor of end-stage renal disease, and it is also associated with UC. However, the interplay between CKD and UC lacks solid evidence. Acrolein is produced by polyamines and has been suggested to be the uremic "toxin." The level of acrolein correlates well with chronic renal failure. We recently found that acrolein-induced DNA damage and inhibited DNA repair in urothelial cells, which contribute to bladder cancer. Therefore, we hypothesize that acrolein is involved in the formation of UC in patients with CKD.

Journal

Urologic oncologyPubmed

Published: May 15, 2020

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