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The plans of men

The plans of men Reviews the book, by L. W. Doob (1940). This book represents, in the author's own words, an "attempt to integrate certain aspects of the social sciences with some of the practical issues that face everyone" (p. vi). More specifically it is an analysis of planning as this is related to the nature of human activity. The complexities of the problem, which Doob recognizes, make it necessary to extend this critique to many kinds of activity, and to many varieties of planning. One result of this broad survey is to provide a basis for Doob's contention that "master plans," which attempt to control a significantly large portion of human activity, create more problems than they solve, and should be avoided. Another is to indicate that planning of a more specific sort is not only desirable but unavoidable, and that the real task is to make plans as satisfying as possible from a large variety of viewpoints. Still another, less fortunate result of the large scope of the survey is that many important problems have been passed over with relatively little attention. Some of the more stimulating sections of the book relate to economic determinism, the "economic man," the theory of values, Fascist and Soviet economic plans, the psychology of war and peace, and the analysis of regionalism. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology PsycARTICLES®

The plans of men

Abstract

Reviews the book, by L. W. Doob (1940). This book represents, in the author's own words, an "attempt to integrate certain aspects of the social sciences with some of the practical issues that face everyone" (p. vi). More specifically it is an analysis of planning as this is related to the nature of human activity. The complexities of the problem, which Doob recognizes, make it necessary to extend this critique to many kinds of activity, and to many varieties of planning. One result of this broad survey is to provide a basis for Doob's contention that "master plans," which attempt to control a significantly large portion of human activity, create more problems than they solve, and should be avoided. Another is to indicate that planning of a more specific sort is not only desirable but unavoidable, and that the real task is to make plans as satisfying as possible from a large variety of viewpoints. Still another, less fortunate result of the large scope of the survey is that many important problems have been passed over with relatively little attention. Some of the more stimulating sections of the book relate to economic determinism, the "economic man," the theory of values, Fascist and Soviet economic plans, the psychology of war and peace, and the analysis of regionalism.
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