Maria Rickers-Ovsiankina (1898–1993)

Maria Rickers-Ovsiankina (1898–1993) <p>Maria Rickers-Ovsiankina (Marika) was born on May 3, 1898, and lived for 95 years, her life spanning virtually the entire history of psychology as well as an eventful segment of world history. She was born of a Russian father and a German mother in the city of Chita, which is east of Lake Baikal in Asian Russia. While still a child, she and her family moved to the city of Vladivostok at the extreme eastern end of Siberia. She resided there until shortly after the Russian revolution when, together with a sister and her brother, she went to Berlin. The political situation played a role in the move, but it was also the practice at that time for Russian families of means to send their children to study abroad.</p><p>Marika had been interested in literature during her schooling in Russia, and, particularly, she had been interested in analyzing the personalities of fictional literary characters. Her intention had been to continue this study in Berlin, but she found no place where this could be done. What she did find was the Psychological Institute, where personality was an important focus, and she began her studies there. It was there that she http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Psychologist PsycARTICLES®

Maria Rickers-Ovsiankina (1898–1993)

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Maria Rickers-Ovsiankina (1898–1993)

Abstract

<p>Maria Rickers-Ovsiankina (Marika) was born on May 3, 1898, and lived for 95 years, her life spanning virtually the entire history of psychology as well as an eventful segment of world history. She was born of a Russian father and a German mother in the city of Chita, which is east of Lake Baikal in Asian Russia. While still a child, she and her family moved to the city of Vladivostok at the extreme eastern end of Siberia. She resided there until shortly after the Russian revolution when, together with a sister and her brother, she went to Berlin. The political situation played a role in the move, but it was also the practice at that time for Russian families of means to send their children to study abroad.</p><p>Marika had been interested in literature during her schooling in Russia, and, particularly, she had been interested in analyzing the personalities of fictional literary characters. Her intention had been to continue this study in Berlin, but she found no place where this could be done. What she did find was the Psychological Institute, where personality was an important focus, and she began her studies there. It was there that she
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Publisher
PsycARTICLES&reg;
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 by American Psychological Association
ISSN
0003-066X
eISSN
1935-990X
D.O.I.
10.1037/0003-066X.51.6.650
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

<p>Maria Rickers-Ovsiankina (Marika) was born on May 3, 1898, and lived for 95 years, her life spanning virtually the entire history of psychology as well as an eventful segment of world history. She was born of a Russian father and a German mother in the city of Chita, which is east of Lake Baikal in Asian Russia. While still a child, she and her family moved to the city of Vladivostok at the extreme eastern end of Siberia. She resided there until shortly after the Russian revolution when, together with a sister and her brother, she went to Berlin. The political situation played a role in the move, but it was also the practice at that time for Russian families of means to send their children to study abroad.</p><p>Marika had been interested in literature during her schooling in Russia, and, particularly, she had been interested in analyzing the personalities of fictional literary characters. Her intention had been to continue this study in Berlin, but she found no place where this could be done. What she did find was the Psychological Institute, where personality was an important focus, and she began her studies there. It was there that she

Journal

American PsychologistPsycARTICLES®

Published: Jun 1, 1996

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