Borderline Personality Organization, Dissociation, and Willingness to Use Force in Intimate Relationships

Borderline Personality Organization, Dissociation, and Willingness to Use Force in Intimate... This study investigated the causal role of borderline personality interacting with a current stressor in the form of television news on males' willingness to use force in an intimate conflict. It was hypothesized that men who score high on a measure of borderline personality organization (BPO), in response to a contemporary media portrayal of an abandonment threat, would score higher on state dissociation and state anger and would express greater willingness to use force in an intimate conflict than either men low on BPO or men who were exposed to media portrayals of violence. The results supported both this dissociative model of intimate violence and an alternative, social learning model, which suggests that imitation of media violence also increases the willingness to use force in intimate conflicts. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychology of Men & Masculinity PsycARTICLES®

Borderline Personality Organization, Dissociation, and Willingness to Use Force in Intimate Relationships

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Publisher
Educational Publishing Foundation
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by Educational Publishing Foundation
ISSN
1524-9220
eISSN
1939-151X
D.O.I.
10.1037/1524-9220.1.1.37
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study investigated the causal role of borderline personality interacting with a current stressor in the form of television news on males' willingness to use force in an intimate conflict. It was hypothesized that men who score high on a measure of borderline personality organization (BPO), in response to a contemporary media portrayal of an abandonment threat, would score higher on state dissociation and state anger and would express greater willingness to use force in an intimate conflict than either men low on BPO or men who were exposed to media portrayals of violence. The results supported both this dissociative model of intimate violence and an alternative, social learning model, which suggests that imitation of media violence also increases the willingness to use force in intimate conflicts.

Journal

Psychology of Men & MasculinityPsycARTICLES®

Published: Jan 1, 2000

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