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Youth Offending and Restorative Justice

Youth Offending and Restorative Justice book review The youth justice system of England and Wales has incorporated many restorative elements and nowhere more so than in the introduction of referral orders (ROs) and youth offender panels (YOPs) in the wake of the Youth Justice and Criminal Evidence Act 1999. The Act intends that on their first court appearance, all young offenders will be referred to a YOP with lay and professional membership. The young person, their parents, victims and other stakeholders will attend the YOP in order to devise an appropriate response to the offence and enshrine it in a ‘contract’. Adam Crawford and A Crawford and T Newburn Cullompton: Willan Publishing (2003) 256pp (£40 hardback) Tim Newburn’s book reports on their evaluation of the Home Office pilots of ROs and YOPs. The authors are keenly aware of the criticisms levelled at these measures by fellow criminologists but argue that this critique is essentially polemical, being based upon a reading of statements of political intent and government press releases rather than a rigorous analysis of the realities of policy implementation. This blanket dismissal of the critique is outdated however since the initial critique has subsequently been substantiated by a growing body of empirical http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Safer Communities Pier Professional

Youth Offending and Restorative Justice

Safer Communities , Volume 3 (3) – Jul 1, 2004

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Publisher
Pier Professional
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 by Pier Professional Limited
ISSN
1757-8043
eISSN
2042-8774
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

book review The youth justice system of England and Wales has incorporated many restorative elements and nowhere more so than in the introduction of referral orders (ROs) and youth offender panels (YOPs) in the wake of the Youth Justice and Criminal Evidence Act 1999. The Act intends that on their first court appearance, all young offenders will be referred to a YOP with lay and professional membership. The young person, their parents, victims and other stakeholders will attend the YOP in order to devise an appropriate response to the offence and enshrine it in a ‘contract’. Adam Crawford and A Crawford and T Newburn Cullompton: Willan Publishing (2003) 256pp (£40 hardback) Tim Newburn’s book reports on their evaluation of the Home Office pilots of ROs and YOPs. The authors are keenly aware of the criticisms levelled at these measures by fellow criminologists but argue that this critique is essentially polemical, being based upon a reading of statements of political intent and government press releases rather than a rigorous analysis of the realities of policy implementation. This blanket dismissal of the critique is outdated however since the initial critique has subsequently been substantiated by a growing body of empirical

Journal

Safer CommunitiesPier Professional

Published: Jul 1, 2004

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