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What we did on our holidays - a tale of health and social care: A case study

What we did on our holidays - a tale of health and social care: A case study A case study Jill Dawson Jill Dawson is Senior Research Scientist at University of Oxford and visiting Professor at Oxford Brookes University. PART ONE It all began with a low-grade chronic infection. Mary*, aged 93 (worked until she was 74, fiercely independent, with all her marbles intact, but very deaf), had been taking diuretics for nearly two decades. These, together with digoxin (to steady and strengthen heart function) and warfarin (to thin the blood), had maintained her quite well ever since a major myocardial infarction – although her ankles remained swollen and osteoarthritis had invaded one hip. Twelve months previously, an equivocal chance finding in a blood test had triggered a hospital appointment and many tests, including a chest x-ray. Ever since her infarct, Mary’s chest x-rays had provoked alarm, in stark contrast to impressions gained in her presence. On this occasion, the appearance of her x-ray led to an increased diuretic prescription. Over the next year she progressively cut down her fluid intake to try to reduce her tiresome, frequent trips to the lavatory, which presumably encouraged a urinary tract infection. Unaware that her symptoms meant something, Mary had, for a long time, kept them to herself. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Quality in Ageing and Older Adults Pier Professional

What we did on our holidays - a tale of health and social care: A case study

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults , Volume 9 (4) – Dec 1, 2008

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Publisher
Pier Professional
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 by Pier Professional Limited
ISSN
1471-7794
eISSN
2042-8766
Publisher site
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Abstract

A case study Jill Dawson Jill Dawson is Senior Research Scientist at University of Oxford and visiting Professor at Oxford Brookes University. PART ONE It all began with a low-grade chronic infection. Mary*, aged 93 (worked until she was 74, fiercely independent, with all her marbles intact, but very deaf), had been taking diuretics for nearly two decades. These, together with digoxin (to steady and strengthen heart function) and warfarin (to thin the blood), had maintained her quite well ever since a major myocardial infarction – although her ankles remained swollen and osteoarthritis had invaded one hip. Twelve months previously, an equivocal chance finding in a blood test had triggered a hospital appointment and many tests, including a chest x-ray. Ever since her infarct, Mary’s chest x-rays had provoked alarm, in stark contrast to impressions gained in her presence. On this occasion, the appearance of her x-ray led to an increased diuretic prescription. Over the next year she progressively cut down her fluid intake to try to reduce her tiresome, frequent trips to the lavatory, which presumably encouraged a urinary tract infection. Unaware that her symptoms meant something, Mary had, for a long time, kept them to herself.

Journal

Quality in Ageing and Older AdultsPier Professional

Published: Dec 1, 2008

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