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Transdisciplinary working: the social worker as case manager

Transdisciplinary working: the social worker as case manager This paper explores the practice experience and dilemmas of being a social worker in a case management role. It draws on a case study taken from actual practice to highlight how social workers' training places them in an ideal position to smoothly manage the transitions that individuals and their families face. Permission of those involved has been sought and given, although names have been changed to protect confidentiality. The paper highlights how the fact that brain injury can be a ‘hidden disability’ can mean that its effects on both survivor and carers may be understated, with a consequent inadequate allocation of service provision and support. Support for those with brain injuries often comes from more than one statutory organisation and the challenges of managing and co-ordinating this across organisational boundaries are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Care and Neurodisability Pier Professional

Transdisciplinary working: the social worker as case manager

Social Care and Neurodisability , Volume 2 (1) – Feb 1, 2011

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Publisher
Pier Professional
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 by Pier Professional Limited
ISSN
2042-0919
eISSN
2042-874X
DOI
10.5042/scn.2011.0079
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper explores the practice experience and dilemmas of being a social worker in a case management role. It draws on a case study taken from actual practice to highlight how social workers' training places them in an ideal position to smoothly manage the transitions that individuals and their families face. Permission of those involved has been sought and given, although names have been changed to protect confidentiality. The paper highlights how the fact that brain injury can be a ‘hidden disability’ can mean that its effects on both survivor and carers may be understated, with a consequent inadequate allocation of service provision and support. Support for those with brain injuries often comes from more than one statutory organisation and the challenges of managing and co-ordinating this across organisational boundaries are discussed.

Journal

Social Care and NeurodisabilityPier Professional

Published: Feb 1, 2011

Keywords: Brain injury

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