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Promoting positive sexual development among children and adolescents after acquired brain injury

Promoting positive sexual development among children and adolescents after acquired brain injury Positive sexual growth is a key developmental challenge for all children and adolescents. An acquired brain injury (ABI) can create major hurdles to achieving this goal. A conceptual model will be outlined that suggests sexual growth is achieved by progress across six domains, namely: social competence versus social isolation; identity formation, individuation and independence versus dependence and lack of individual identity; physical development versus physical challenge; sexually informed and educated versus sexually ignorant and uneducated; sexually experienced versus sexually inexperienced; and sexually appropriate behaviour versus sexually inappropriate behaviour. The ability to form successful peer relationships is a key mediating factor in the developmental process. Drawing on this model, a number of strategies will be outlined that support the positive sexual development of children and adolescents after ABI. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Care and Neurodisability Pier Professional

Promoting positive sexual development among children and adolescents after acquired brain injury

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Publisher
Pier Professional
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 by Pier Professional Limited
ISSN
2042-0919
eISSN
2042-874X
DOI
10.5042/scn.2010.0205
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Positive sexual growth is a key developmental challenge for all children and adolescents. An acquired brain injury (ABI) can create major hurdles to achieving this goal. A conceptual model will be outlined that suggests sexual growth is achieved by progress across six domains, namely: social competence versus social isolation; identity formation, individuation and independence versus dependence and lack of individual identity; physical development versus physical challenge; sexually informed and educated versus sexually ignorant and uneducated; sexually experienced versus sexually inexperienced; and sexually appropriate behaviour versus sexually inappropriate behaviour. The ability to form successful peer relationships is a key mediating factor in the developmental process. Drawing on this model, a number of strategies will be outlined that support the positive sexual development of children and adolescents after ABI.

Journal

Social Care and NeurodisabilityPier Professional

Published: May 1, 2010

Keywords: Psychosexual development

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