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Leadership: ‘If you want the rainbow, you have to put up with the rain’

Leadership: ‘If you want the rainbow, you have to put up with the rain’ Charlotte Housden Hodes Solutions Consulting n July 2006 The Economist presented an interesting fact: 728 chief executives left their jobs in the first half of 2006. This was 6.9% more than during the same period in 2005 – a record high of 1,322 departures. This has been steadily decreasing – Cranfield University found that the average time in role went down from 30 months to 18 months between 2002 to 2005. We are all aware that tenures of leaders and senior managers are becoming shorter, but what drives this temporary nature of leadership positions? There are many and varied reasons, but one of the key factors is expectation. Since the transformational and charismatic leadership movement in the 1980s there has been an increase in the visibility of leaders (see the in the previous issue – Housden, 2006) and a rise in expectations about the size and rate of change that a leader can deliver. If our assumption is that much of an organisation’s success is down to its leader, when an organisation is unsuccessful, then we believe it is mostly down to the leader. And, if it’s the fault of the leader, then they must go! This assumption http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The International Journal of Leadership in Public Services Pier Professional

Leadership: ‘If you want the rainbow, you have to put up with the rain’

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Publisher
Pier Professional
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 by Pier Professional Limited
ISSN
1747-9886
eISSN
2042-8642
Publisher site
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Abstract

Charlotte Housden Hodes Solutions Consulting n July 2006 The Economist presented an interesting fact: 728 chief executives left their jobs in the first half of 2006. This was 6.9% more than during the same period in 2005 – a record high of 1,322 departures. This has been steadily decreasing – Cranfield University found that the average time in role went down from 30 months to 18 months between 2002 to 2005. We are all aware that tenures of leaders and senior managers are becoming shorter, but what drives this temporary nature of leadership positions? There are many and varied reasons, but one of the key factors is expectation. Since the transformational and charismatic leadership movement in the 1980s there has been an increase in the visibility of leaders (see the in the previous issue – Housden, 2006) and a rise in expectations about the size and rate of change that a leader can deliver. If our assumption is that much of an organisation’s success is down to its leader, when an organisation is unsuccessful, then we believe it is mostly down to the leader. And, if it’s the fault of the leader, then they must go! This assumption

Journal

The International Journal of Leadership in Public ServicesPier Professional

Published: Sep 1, 2006

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