Fifty - the new sixty? The health and social care of older prisoners

Fifty - the new sixty? The health and social care of older prisoners The fastest growing sector of the prison population is older people. Although the numbers are still relatively small (just under 2,500 in 2007), it would seem that the ‘sameness’ principle within prisons renders older prisoners invisible. The health of older prisoners is a matter of concern - research indicates that you age 10 years faster in prison (Uzoaba, 1998) which can compound the problems that may be associated with ageing. The provision of health and social care do not match those for older people outside of the prison system. This article considers the legal issues surrounding the treatment of older prisoners. It recognises that restrictions on liberty are a component of the prison system; however, it questions whether the consequences of ‘sameness’ infringe the legal rights of older prisons. It recommends a statutory presumption of equivalence of care, which can only be rebutted expressly or by necessary implication. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Quality in Ageing and Older Adults Pier Professional

Fifty - the new sixty? The health and social care of older prisoners

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, Volume 11 (3) – Sep 1, 2010

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Publisher
Pier Professional
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 by Pier Professional Limited
ISSN
1471-7794
eISSN
2042-8766
D.O.I.
10.5042/qiaoa.2010.0525
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The fastest growing sector of the prison population is older people. Although the numbers are still relatively small (just under 2,500 in 2007), it would seem that the ‘sameness’ principle within prisons renders older prisoners invisible. The health of older prisoners is a matter of concern - research indicates that you age 10 years faster in prison (Uzoaba, 1998) which can compound the problems that may be associated with ageing. The provision of health and social care do not match those for older people outside of the prison system. This article considers the legal issues surrounding the treatment of older prisoners. It recognises that restrictions on liberty are a component of the prison system; however, it questions whether the consequences of ‘sameness’ infringe the legal rights of older prisons. It recommends a statutory presumption of equivalence of care, which can only be rebutted expressly or by necessary implication.

Journal

Quality in Ageing and Older AdultsPier Professional

Published: Sep 1, 2010

Keywords: Older prisoner

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