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Editorial

Editorial Andy Mantell and Patti Simonson Editors Welcome to Volume 2, Issue 1 of Social Care and Neurodisability (SCN). This quarterly Journal aims to be a single source of knowledge on legislation, best practice and research for those working with, and affected by, neurological conditions. This issue explores both dominant and marginalised discourses in adult social care. In the practice section, Steve Wiseman explores transdisciplinary working. He discusses what a social worker can bring to the brain injury case manager role within the health service. Drawing on a case study, he demonstrates how the effective practitioner acts as a conduit between services and serves as a point of continuity for people with brain injuries and their families through the difficult changes and transitions that occur following traumatic brain injury. Such support and continuity would have been very helpful for Mary, who talked with Terry Scragg about her experiences of caring for her husband Richard. He developed a rare hereditary condition (prion disease) and her account highlights the distress and difficulties caused by uncertainty as the professionals struggled to identify his condition. Due to Richard’s strong sense of privacy, he was reluctant to accept help from others. While they received http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Care and Neurodisability Pier Professional

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Publisher
Pier Professional
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 by Pier Professional Limited
ISSN
2042-0919
eISSN
2042-874X
DOI
10.5042/scn.2011.0078
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Andy Mantell and Patti Simonson Editors Welcome to Volume 2, Issue 1 of Social Care and Neurodisability (SCN). This quarterly Journal aims to be a single source of knowledge on legislation, best practice and research for those working with, and affected by, neurological conditions. This issue explores both dominant and marginalised discourses in adult social care. In the practice section, Steve Wiseman explores transdisciplinary working. He discusses what a social worker can bring to the brain injury case manager role within the health service. Drawing on a case study, he demonstrates how the effective practitioner acts as a conduit between services and serves as a point of continuity for people with brain injuries and their families through the difficult changes and transitions that occur following traumatic brain injury. Such support and continuity would have been very helpful for Mary, who talked with Terry Scragg about her experiences of caring for her husband Richard. He developed a rare hereditary condition (prion disease) and her account highlights the distress and difficulties caused by uncertainty as the professionals struggled to identify his condition. Due to Richard’s strong sense of privacy, he was reluctant to accept help from others. While they received

Journal

Social Care and NeurodisabilityPier Professional

Published: Feb 1, 2011

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