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Editorial

Editorial Ron Iphofen Editor We are delighted to have a contribution to this issue from our North American colleagues, Lori Weeks and Karen Roberto. As their work demonstrates, older women are highly aware of the consequences for their quality of life of an accidental fall, more importantly they recognise their own responsibility for ensuring, as much as possible, that such falls do not occur. The vital importance of a focus group methodology for encouraging disclosure of the occurrence of falls is highly instructive. It is also interesting to note that the respondents were as concerned about the psychosocial consequences of a fall as they were with the physical consequences. This link to profound quality of life changes and the resultant fear of falling again – which seems more prevalent amongst women than men – offers an important insight for carers. They offer some useful advice for organising falls prevention information, how best to promote it and, in particular, to empower those women who are most at risk. (In a spirit of transatlantic collegiality we have allowed Lori and Karen to retain North American spelling and, in particular, the wonderfully respectful term for older people – ‘seniors’.) Maria Horne and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Quality in Ageing and Older Adults Pier Professional

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Publisher
Pier Professional
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by Pier Professional Limited
ISSN
1471-7794
eISSN
2042-8766
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Ron Iphofen Editor We are delighted to have a contribution to this issue from our North American colleagues, Lori Weeks and Karen Roberto. As their work demonstrates, older women are highly aware of the consequences for their quality of life of an accidental fall, more importantly they recognise their own responsibility for ensuring, as much as possible, that such falls do not occur. The vital importance of a focus group methodology for encouraging disclosure of the occurrence of falls is highly instructive. It is also interesting to note that the respondents were as concerned about the psychosocial consequences of a fall as they were with the physical consequences. This link to profound quality of life changes and the resultant fear of falling again – which seems more prevalent amongst women than men – offers an important insight for carers. They offer some useful advice for organising falls prevention information, how best to promote it and, in particular, to empower those women who are most at risk. (In a spirit of transatlantic collegiality we have allowed Lori and Karen to retain North American spelling and, in particular, the wonderfully respectful term for older people – ‘seniors’.) Maria Horne and

Journal

Quality in Ageing and Older AdultsPier Professional

Published: Nov 1, 2003

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