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Editorial

Editorial Mike Nolan Professor of Gerontological Nursing, Sheffield Institute for Studies on Ageing, University of Sheffield, UK It is a great privilege to have been asked to edit this special edition of Quality in Ageing, which explores the topic of promoting partnerships in quality, culture change and service development. Partnerships are seen to lie at the heart of modern day health and social care (DH, 2008; NMC, 2009), and few would argue with such sentiments or deny the right of all people to play an active part, both as citizens and as individuals, in the way in which services in general are developed and how they are experienced by service users and their families. The rhetoric is compelling but making it happen in practice, especially for frail older people, is quite another matter. Indeed, a number of recent reports by organisations such as Help the Aged (Levenson, 2007) and the King’s Fund (Firth-Cozens & Cornwell, 2009) highlight major concerns about the quality of care and support offered to the most vulnerable older members of society. This special edition draws on a number of projects addressing diverse issues and delivered in quite differing geographical contexts. Two of the papers come http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Quality in Ageing and Older Adults Pier Professional

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Publisher
Pier Professional
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 by Pier Professional Limited
ISSN
1471-7794
eISSN
2042-8766
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Mike Nolan Professor of Gerontological Nursing, Sheffield Institute for Studies on Ageing, University of Sheffield, UK It is a great privilege to have been asked to edit this special edition of Quality in Ageing, which explores the topic of promoting partnerships in quality, culture change and service development. Partnerships are seen to lie at the heart of modern day health and social care (DH, 2008; NMC, 2009), and few would argue with such sentiments or deny the right of all people to play an active part, both as citizens and as individuals, in the way in which services in general are developed and how they are experienced by service users and their families. The rhetoric is compelling but making it happen in practice, especially for frail older people, is quite another matter. Indeed, a number of recent reports by organisations such as Help the Aged (Levenson, 2007) and the King’s Fund (Firth-Cozens & Cornwell, 2009) highlight major concerns about the quality of care and support offered to the most vulnerable older members of society. This special edition draws on a number of projects addressing diverse issues and delivered in quite differing geographical contexts. Two of the papers come

Journal

Quality in Ageing and Older AdultsPier Professional

Published: Sep 1, 2009

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