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Editorial Innovating for health and social care: delivering what works for the most needy

Editorial Innovating for health and social care: delivering what works for the most needy David Sallah The United Kingdom’s National Health Service (NHS) has seen an unprecedented growth in funding over the past decade; doubling to more than £106 billion for the next two years. But according to a new report by the King’s Fund and the Institute of Fiscal Studies, the NHS needs to brace itself for a funding freeze that could last for six years (Appleby et al, 2009). This means hard times ahead for the NHS and for people who use its services, particularly those who are already disadvantaged in accessing services, expressing choice and/or experiencing inequalities of outcomes. Complicating the picture and challenging politicians, planners and policy-makers is the British Medical Association’s (BMA) survey of the general population; this survey shows that 77% of the respondents agree that NHS funding should be protected in the face of any future spending cuts (Management in Practice, 2009). Herein lies the challenge for us all. The savings that have to be made in the face of spending cuts or no growth and at a time health care needs are increasing, against the tax payers’ view that there should not be any cuts. Whichever way this is perceived, the NHS will have http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care Pier Professional

Editorial Innovating for health and social care: delivering what works for the most needy

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Publisher
Pier Professional
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 by Pier Professional Limited
ISSN
1757-0980
eISSN
2042-8367
Publisher site
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Abstract

David Sallah The United Kingdom’s National Health Service (NHS) has seen an unprecedented growth in funding over the past decade; doubling to more than £106 billion for the next two years. But according to a new report by the King’s Fund and the Institute of Fiscal Studies, the NHS needs to brace itself for a funding freeze that could last for six years (Appleby et al, 2009). This means hard times ahead for the NHS and for people who use its services, particularly those who are already disadvantaged in accessing services, expressing choice and/or experiencing inequalities of outcomes. Complicating the picture and challenging politicians, planners and policy-makers is the British Medical Association’s (BMA) survey of the general population; this survey shows that 77% of the respondents agree that NHS funding should be protected in the face of any future spending cuts (Management in Practice, 2009). Herein lies the challenge for us all. The savings that have to be made in the face of spending cuts or no growth and at a time health care needs are increasing, against the tax payers’ view that there should not be any cuts. Whichever way this is perceived, the NHS will have

Journal

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social CarePier Professional

Published: Jul 1, 2009

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