Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Editorial

Editorial Ron Iphofen, Editor University of Wales, Bangor Chris Joyce, Chief Executive BASE Guilford, Surrey In this issue, Sally Jacobs and Caroline Glendinning review the minimal evidence about the relationships between NHS services and nursing and residential homes in England and Wales. In addition to indicating priority areas for attention, building on existing initiatives, they argue for a continuing service-oriented research agenda that will demonstrably improve NHS provision to the private sector. The Modernising Social Services white paper of 1998 and last year’s Care Standards Act heralded a huge agenda of social care reform which will have major benefits for the care of older people. The newly established National Care Standards Commission will be carefully monitoring and applying uniform care standards across the UK; as a result we expect to be publishing many papers in the next few issues that directly address such issues of ‘quality’. In this new ‘regulatory landscape’ the importance of achieving a better qualified workforce through appropriate education, training and staff development is at last gaining prominence. In all care settings for older people the regulatory system will require evidence that staff have, or are being helped to acquire, the skills and understanding necessary for working with people who are often vulnerable and have complex care needs. Lesley Bell, who has a long established reputation in the field of home care issues, points out in her article that the large majority of the people with care needs are living in their own homes. Under the new care standards, people working in registered home care can no longer be seen as providing too basic a service to require professional skills and values. They will need to show fitness for the purpose and, if recruitment is to keep pace with demand, the sector will need to demonstrate that home care offers a career path, not just a job. A close relationship is shown between training and high quality service development and the article concludes with the thought that care will be expected increasingly to come to the people who need it rather than the people coming to the care. Brad Hagen and Chris Armstrong-Esther discuss the inappropriate use of medications for older people in nursing homes. They focus on the monitoring of neuroleptic drug administration and make recommendations to minimise the risk associated with neuroleptic drug use and to promote good clinical practice. They conclude that many kinds of difficult behaviours in nursing home residents are best dealt with by good social and nursing care, and that medications should not be assumed to be the first response to behavioural problems. Finally, we are fortunate to have a paper from colleagues in Sweden eager to establish research in caring that embodies caring research. This may offer a model for others keen to employ research methods that match the settings and subjects we work with more authentically. Our books section is longer than in previous issues since we are receiving more works to review as the journal is gaining recognition. As always, we are pleased to hear from readers willing to review books for us. Quality in Ageing – Policy, practice and research Volume 2 Issue 2 June 2001 © Pavilion Publishing 2001 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Quality in Ageing and Older Adults Pier Professional

Loading next page...
 
/lp/pier-professional/editorial-W8yhWQkz29
Publisher
Pier Professional
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 by Pier Professional Limited
ISSN
1471-7794
eISSN
2042-8766
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Ron Iphofen, Editor University of Wales, Bangor Chris Joyce, Chief Executive BASE Guilford, Surrey In this issue, Sally Jacobs and Caroline Glendinning review the minimal evidence about the relationships between NHS services and nursing and residential homes in England and Wales. In addition to indicating priority areas for attention, building on existing initiatives, they argue for a continuing service-oriented research agenda that will demonstrably improve NHS provision to the private sector. The Modernising Social Services white paper of 1998 and last year’s Care Standards Act heralded a huge agenda of social care reform which will have major benefits for the care of older people. The newly established National Care Standards Commission will be carefully monitoring and applying uniform care standards across the UK; as a result we expect to be publishing many papers in the next few issues that directly address such issues of ‘quality’. In this new ‘regulatory landscape’ the importance of achieving a better qualified workforce through appropriate education, training and staff development is at last gaining prominence. In all care settings for older people the regulatory system will require evidence that staff have, or are being helped to acquire, the skills and understanding necessary for working with people who are often vulnerable and have complex care needs. Lesley Bell, who has a long established reputation in the field of home care issues, points out in her article that the large majority of the people with care needs are living in their own homes. Under the new care standards, people working in registered home care can no longer be seen as providing too basic a service to require professional skills and values. They will need to show fitness for the purpose and, if recruitment is to keep pace with demand, the sector will need to demonstrate that home care offers a career path, not just a job. A close relationship is shown between training and high quality service development and the article concludes with the thought that care will be expected increasingly to come to the people who need it rather than the people coming to the care. Brad Hagen and Chris Armstrong-Esther discuss the inappropriate use of medications for older people in nursing homes. They focus on the monitoring of neuroleptic drug administration and make recommendations to minimise the risk associated with neuroleptic drug use and to promote good clinical practice. They conclude that many kinds of difficult behaviours in nursing home residents are best dealt with by good social and nursing care, and that medications should not be assumed to be the first response to behavioural problems. Finally, we are fortunate to have a paper from colleagues in Sweden eager to establish research in caring that embodies caring research. This may offer a model for others keen to employ research methods that match the settings and subjects we work with more authentically. Our books section is longer than in previous issues since we are receiving more works to review as the journal is gaining recognition. As always, we are pleased to hear from readers willing to review books for us. Quality in Ageing – Policy, practice and research Volume 2 Issue 2 June 2001 © Pavilion Publishing 2001

Journal

Quality in Ageing and Older AdultsPier Professional

Published: Jun 1, 2001

There are no references for this article.