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Editorial

Editorial Alan Marlow is a freelance researcher and consultant. He is a visiting Professor at the University of Luton. He was formerly a senior police officer. Three pieces of research have been produced this year concerning the link between drug use and offending. The results of the NEW-ADAM Programme (Holloway, Bennett & Lower, 2004) compare the findings of year 1 of the study (1999/00) and year 3 (2001/2). The research is based upon the testing and consultation of interviewees across 16 custody suites. There is modest good news in that there has been no increase in the proportion of arrestees testing positive for drugs (65% in both years). There was also a slight decrease in the number of heroin, crack or cocaine users who reported committing one or more property crimes (92% to 85%) and the median illegal income of arrestees remained constant at £4,800. However, the use of the intensely addictive crack cocaine in the preceding three days by arrestees increased from 10% to 14%. Median expenditure on drugs in the week preceding arrest increased from £200 to £300. As the authors point out, the interviews and tests related to selected locations and therefore generalisations should not be http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Safer Communities Pier Professional

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Publisher
Pier Professional
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 by Pier Professional Limited
ISSN
1757-8043
eISSN
2042-8774
Publisher site
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Abstract

Alan Marlow is a freelance researcher and consultant. He is a visiting Professor at the University of Luton. He was formerly a senior police officer. Three pieces of research have been produced this year concerning the link between drug use and offending. The results of the NEW-ADAM Programme (Holloway, Bennett & Lower, 2004) compare the findings of year 1 of the study (1999/00) and year 3 (2001/2). The research is based upon the testing and consultation of interviewees across 16 custody suites. There is modest good news in that there has been no increase in the proportion of arrestees testing positive for drugs (65% in both years). There was also a slight decrease in the number of heroin, crack or cocaine users who reported committing one or more property crimes (92% to 85%) and the median illegal income of arrestees remained constant at £4,800. However, the use of the intensely addictive crack cocaine in the preceding three days by arrestees increased from 10% to 14%. Median expenditure on drugs in the week preceding arrest increased from £200 to £300. As the authors point out, the interviews and tests related to selected locations and therefore generalisations should not be

Journal

Safer CommunitiesPier Professional

Published: Jul 1, 2004

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