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Editorial

Editorial Alan Walker, Director of the ESRC Growing Older Research Programme on Extending Quality of Life University of Sheffield This special issue of Quality in Ageing is devoted to the ESRC Growing Older Research Programme on Extending Quality of Life. This is a £3.5 million research programme covering a wide range of issues concerned with quality of life in old age. The programme consists of 24 projects, of varying lengths, covering the period October 1999 to April 2003. So far only a small number of the projects have completed their work (and none of them have finalised their data analysis and writing up) therefore this is very much a preliminary report on the outputs from the programme. I have selected five projects for inclusion in this issue and, in the first article, provide an overview of the programme and an outline of its aims and the challenges it faces. Following the introductory article on the Growing Older Programme, Chris McKevitt and Charles Wolfe illustrate the different perceptions that exist between professionals and older patients and carers with regard to the meaning of quality of life. Their anthropological research highlights the need for a more clearly formulated and robust concept http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Quality in Ageing and Older Adults Pier Professional

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Publisher
Pier Professional
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 by Pier Professional Limited
ISSN
1471-7794
eISSN
2042-8766
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Alan Walker, Director of the ESRC Growing Older Research Programme on Extending Quality of Life University of Sheffield This special issue of Quality in Ageing is devoted to the ESRC Growing Older Research Programme on Extending Quality of Life. This is a £3.5 million research programme covering a wide range of issues concerned with quality of life in old age. The programme consists of 24 projects, of varying lengths, covering the period October 1999 to April 2003. So far only a small number of the projects have completed their work (and none of them have finalised their data analysis and writing up) therefore this is very much a preliminary report on the outputs from the programme. I have selected five projects for inclusion in this issue and, in the first article, provide an overview of the programme and an outline of its aims and the challenges it faces. Following the introductory article on the Growing Older Programme, Chris McKevitt and Charles Wolfe illustrate the different perceptions that exist between professionals and older patients and carers with regard to the meaning of quality of life. Their anthropological research highlights the need for a more clearly formulated and robust concept

Journal

Quality in Ageing and Older AdultsPier Professional

Published: Mar 1, 2002

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