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Editorial

Editorial Ron Iphofen The linking theme throughout this issue is how older people experience care services. Jane Benten and Nicola Spalding begin with reporting their study of the rehabilitation experiences of older people who had moved from an acute hospital ward to an intermediate care unit before returning to their own homes. The introduction of intermediate care was a central plank in NHS plans and in the National Service Framework for Older People, but it was never entirely made clear what form this should take and authorities have interpreted their task in different ways. Jane and Nicola recruited their respondents just prior to discharge, first interviewing them about their views and experiences after they had been back in their homes for just over a week – with a repeat interview to check on accuracy and any further experiences a couple of weeks later. Most felt they had received inadequate information prior to transfer to the rehabilitation centre, they were not given an individualised treatment plan, and interventions were minimal and not seen as particularly constructive. Home transfers varied in timeliness and convenience but all respondents expressed satisfaction with the staff and how they were treated – a common enough http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Quality in Ageing and Older Adults Pier Professional

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Publisher
Pier Professional
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 by Pier Professional Limited
ISSN
1471-7794
eISSN
2042-8766
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Ron Iphofen The linking theme throughout this issue is how older people experience care services. Jane Benten and Nicola Spalding begin with reporting their study of the rehabilitation experiences of older people who had moved from an acute hospital ward to an intermediate care unit before returning to their own homes. The introduction of intermediate care was a central plank in NHS plans and in the National Service Framework for Older People, but it was never entirely made clear what form this should take and authorities have interpreted their task in different ways. Jane and Nicola recruited their respondents just prior to discharge, first interviewing them about their views and experiences after they had been back in their homes for just over a week – with a repeat interview to check on accuracy and any further experiences a couple of weeks later. Most felt they had received inadequate information prior to transfer to the rehabilitation centre, they were not given an individualised treatment plan, and interventions were minimal and not seen as particularly constructive. Home transfers varied in timeliness and convenience but all respondents expressed satisfaction with the staff and how they were treated – a common enough

Journal

Quality in Ageing and Older AdultsPier Professional

Published: Sep 1, 2008

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