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Editorial

Editorial In the last issue of Quality in Ageing (QiA) we published a paper from Australian colleagues focussing on the information needs of older people – specifically how people get ‘information about the information’. Steve Iliffe and colleagues take this concern further in their report of an evaluation of a health technology approach designed to improve the care of older people by raising standards and promoting independence. They describe an ‘expert system’ intended to improve older people’s access to health and social care information, to enable service providers to review the health and social care needs of older people, and to allow planners to assess the needs of whole populations. A concern about such systems is whether or not they are sufficiently ‘user-friendly’ for older people and the team’s assessment so far is that this one certainly seems to be understandable and easy to use. The goals of a multi-stakeholder project such as this are necessarily ambitious, but vital, and the team are keen to invite discussion and responses from QiA readers. I would be delighted to publish any constructive dialogue or other relevant insights and ideas in a future issue of the journal. Pensions issues have been a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Quality in Ageing and Older Adults Pier Professional

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Publisher
Pier Professional
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by Pier Professional Limited
ISSN
1471-7794
eISSN
2042-8766
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In the last issue of Quality in Ageing (QiA) we published a paper from Australian colleagues focussing on the information needs of older people – specifically how people get ‘information about the information’. Steve Iliffe and colleagues take this concern further in their report of an evaluation of a health technology approach designed to improve the care of older people by raising standards and promoting independence. They describe an ‘expert system’ intended to improve older people’s access to health and social care information, to enable service providers to review the health and social care needs of older people, and to allow planners to assess the needs of whole populations. A concern about such systems is whether or not they are sufficiently ‘user-friendly’ for older people and the team’s assessment so far is that this one certainly seems to be understandable and easy to use. The goals of a multi-stakeholder project such as this are necessarily ambitious, but vital, and the team are keen to invite discussion and responses from QiA readers. I would be delighted to publish any constructive dialogue or other relevant insights and ideas in a future issue of the journal. Pensions issues have been a

Journal

Quality in Ageing and Older AdultsPier Professional

Published: Dec 1, 2005

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