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Editorial

Editorial Ron Iphofen, Editor University of Wales, Bangor It is well known that the ‘informal’ carers of older people with dementia tend to be older people themselves. It is also generally assumed that professional care support for such people would typically come from the community psychiatric nurse. The study that Susan Pickard and Caroline Glendinning report here demonstrates the mismatch between carers’ and professionals’ expectations of the form that care can and should take. Peter Hobson, Lesley Leeds and Jolyon Meara’s research also looks at carers, but from the point of view of their coping strategies and how they relate to quality of life. In a multivariate study of Parkinson’s disease patients and their carers, they examined the factors influencing the range of coping strategies adopted. Acknowledging these relationships to be complex, they point up some of the measurement difficulties involved in research of this nature. In this issue, for the first time, we have two literature reviews. Jason Ellis, Mark Cropley and Sarah Hampson examine the problems associated with insomnia in older people and draw ideas from the literature which help resist the expectation that ‘sleep problems’ are an inevitability of growing older. They conclude that more sleep research specifically targeted at older people is needed in order to inform improved policy and practice. Jane Bentley, Julienne Meyer and Kalman Kafetz, in their review of day hospital care assessment, also outline the key measurement difficulties involved in such appraisal. As we have seen more than once before in Quality in Ageing, traditional quantitative measurement approaches are inadequate to deal with the variability in service provision and individual needs. As a consequence they question policy demands for service review until more valid and reliable comparative indicators can be developed. In some respects all of the work reported in this issue suggests the need for greater methodological sophistication in research that influences care policy and practice for older people – an approach entirely consistent with our editorial policy. Quality in Ageing – Policy, practice and research Volume 2 Issue 4 December 2001 © Pavilion Publishing 2001 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Quality in Ageing and Older Adults Pier Professional

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Publisher
Pier Professional
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 by Pier Professional Limited
ISSN
1471-7794
eISSN
2042-8766
Publisher site
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Abstract

Ron Iphofen, Editor University of Wales, Bangor It is well known that the ‘informal’ carers of older people with dementia tend to be older people themselves. It is also generally assumed that professional care support for such people would typically come from the community psychiatric nurse. The study that Susan Pickard and Caroline Glendinning report here demonstrates the mismatch between carers’ and professionals’ expectations of the form that care can and should take. Peter Hobson, Lesley Leeds and Jolyon Meara’s research also looks at carers, but from the point of view of their coping strategies and how they relate to quality of life. In a multivariate study of Parkinson’s disease patients and their carers, they examined the factors influencing the range of coping strategies adopted. Acknowledging these relationships to be complex, they point up some of the measurement difficulties involved in research of this nature. In this issue, for the first time, we have two literature reviews. Jason Ellis, Mark Cropley and Sarah Hampson examine the problems associated with insomnia in older people and draw ideas from the literature which help resist the expectation that ‘sleep problems’ are an inevitability of growing older. They conclude that more sleep research specifically targeted at older people is needed in order to inform improved policy and practice. Jane Bentley, Julienne Meyer and Kalman Kafetz, in their review of day hospital care assessment, also outline the key measurement difficulties involved in such appraisal. As we have seen more than once before in Quality in Ageing, traditional quantitative measurement approaches are inadequate to deal with the variability in service provision and individual needs. As a consequence they question policy demands for service review until more valid and reliable comparative indicators can be developed. In some respects all of the work reported in this issue suggests the need for greater methodological sophistication in research that influences care policy and practice for older people – an approach entirely consistent with our editorial policy. Quality in Ageing – Policy, practice and research Volume 2 Issue 4 December 2001 © Pavilion Publishing 2001

Journal

Quality in Ageing and Older AdultsPier Professional

Published: Dec 1, 2001

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