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Case Studies in Geriatric Medicine

Case Studies in Geriatric Medicine Book review Reviewed by: Dr Simon Hill Consultant Geriatrician, North West Wales Trust, Eyryri Hospital, Caernarfon, Gwynedd and Fiona Hill Lecturer in Occupational Therapy, University of Wales, Bangor Ahronheim JC, Huang Z-B, Yen V, Davitt C and Barile D (2005) Cambridge University Press ISBN: 978 052153 175 7 This book presents a case-based approach to geriatric medicine and is clearly written and easy to follow throughout. It is evidence based and comprehensively referenced. The case histories cover an interesting spectrum of conditions and approach them in a non disease-specific way by presentation, however atypical, rather than pathological type. The case studies are written from the doctor’s perspective and the use of questions to challenge established thinking, as well as promote discussion and reflection is welcome. Discussion of each case also focuses on consideration of possibilities rather than provision of diagnostic or therapeutic certainties. This makes it a potentially very useful resource for group teaching of medical students or GPs. The North American representation of medication, laboratory results and financial and legal frameworks however, does make this less useful to UK readers. The emphasis on accurate diagnosis as a basis for management is to be commended. This effectively counters the growing necessity in the UK for primary care teams and intermediate care teams to have to manage complex illness and disability in older people without clarity of diagnosis due to lack of consultant geriatrician input to these cases. Perhaps the main criticism of this book is that it is, on the whole, biomedical in its emphasis, which is acceptable if it is aimed at doctors only and it would indeed be especially suitable for those studying for a diploma in geriatric medicine. However, despite the claims made by the authors that the book would be suitable for ‘all health professionals and trainees who provide care for the elderly’, it is not so relevant to nurses and even less relevant still to therapists. It is felt that opportunities have been missed to genuinely approach cases in a multidisciplinary way, especially when they have been written in such a way as to encourage consideration of complex needs. Quality in Ageing – Policy, practice and research Volume 8 Issue 2 June 2007 © Pavilion Journals (Brighton) Ltd 2007 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Quality in Ageing and Older Adults Pier Professional

Case Studies in Geriatric Medicine

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Publisher
Pier Professional
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by Pier Professional Limited
ISSN
1471-7794
eISSN
2042-8766
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Book review Reviewed by: Dr Simon Hill Consultant Geriatrician, North West Wales Trust, Eyryri Hospital, Caernarfon, Gwynedd and Fiona Hill Lecturer in Occupational Therapy, University of Wales, Bangor Ahronheim JC, Huang Z-B, Yen V, Davitt C and Barile D (2005) Cambridge University Press ISBN: 978 052153 175 7 This book presents a case-based approach to geriatric medicine and is clearly written and easy to follow throughout. It is evidence based and comprehensively referenced. The case histories cover an interesting spectrum of conditions and approach them in a non disease-specific way by presentation, however atypical, rather than pathological type. The case studies are written from the doctor’s perspective and the use of questions to challenge established thinking, as well as promote discussion and reflection is welcome. Discussion of each case also focuses on consideration of possibilities rather than provision of diagnostic or therapeutic certainties. This makes it a potentially very useful resource for group teaching of medical students or GPs. The North American representation of medication, laboratory results and financial and legal frameworks however, does make this less useful to UK readers. The emphasis on accurate diagnosis as a basis for management is to be commended. This effectively counters the growing necessity in the UK for primary care teams and intermediate care teams to have to manage complex illness and disability in older people without clarity of diagnosis due to lack of consultant geriatrician input to these cases. Perhaps the main criticism of this book is that it is, on the whole, biomedical in its emphasis, which is acceptable if it is aimed at doctors only and it would indeed be especially suitable for those studying for a diploma in geriatric medicine. However, despite the claims made by the authors that the book would be suitable for ‘all health professionals and trainees who provide care for the elderly’, it is not so relevant to nurses and even less relevant still to therapists. It is felt that opportunities have been missed to genuinely approach cases in a multidisciplinary way, especially when they have been written in such a way as to encourage consideration of complex needs. Quality in Ageing – Policy, practice and research Volume 8 Issue 2 June 2007 © Pavilion Journals (Brighton) Ltd 2007

Journal

Quality in Ageing and Older AdultsPier Professional

Published: Jun 1, 2007

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