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Architectural change and the effects on the perceptions of the ward environment in a medium secure unit for women

Architectural change and the effects on the perceptions of the ward environment in a medium... Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to describe the architectural design considerations and effects of moving patients from an adapted Victorian medium secure unit to a purpose built facility. Design/methodology/approach - Patients and staff views of the old and new unit environments were compared in terms of homeliness, architectural features, ward atmosphere (WAS) and patient satisfaction. Findings - The new unit was rated as more homely. The change of environment did not increase risk behaviours and was associated with a reduction in symptomatology. Research limitations/implications - Limitations of the study include the small-sample size and choice of measure of WAS. More research is needed into the constituents of “planned” environments where the physical environment is the primary intervention. Practical implications - These include the need for close collaboration among architects, clinicians and patients in order to maximise the therapeutic benefit of the built environment. Originality/value - This paper contributes to a small literature that “bridges” architectural, psychiatric and environmental domains. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The British Journal of Forensic Practice Pier Professional

Architectural change and the effects on the perceptions of the ward environment in a medium secure unit for women

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Publisher
Pier Professional
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 by Pier Professional Limited
ISSN
1463-6646
eISSN
2042-8340
DOI
10.1108/14636641111157850
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to describe the architectural design considerations and effects of moving patients from an adapted Victorian medium secure unit to a purpose built facility. Design/methodology/approach - Patients and staff views of the old and new unit environments were compared in terms of homeliness, architectural features, ward atmosphere (WAS) and patient satisfaction. Findings - The new unit was rated as more homely. The change of environment did not increase risk behaviours and was associated with a reduction in symptomatology. Research limitations/implications - Limitations of the study include the small-sample size and choice of measure of WAS. More research is needed into the constituents of “planned” environments where the physical environment is the primary intervention. Practical implications - These include the need for close collaboration among architects, clinicians and patients in order to maximise the therapeutic benefit of the built environment. Originality/value - This paper contributes to a small literature that “bridges” architectural, psychiatric and environmental domains.

Journal

The British Journal of Forensic PracticePier Professional

Published: Jan 1, 2011

Keywords: Architecture

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