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Aging and Caring at the Intersection of Work and Home Life Blurring the boundaries

Aging and Caring at the Intersection of Work and Home Life Blurring the boundaries Book Review Reviewed by Panos Papanikolaou Research Fellow in the School of Nursing and Midwifery at Cardiff University Martin-Mathew A and Phillips J (Editors) London: Psychology Press ISBN: 978 0 80585 917 1 Two academics, well known for their research in the provision of lay care for older people, have edited this book. It reflects the increasing number of older people and their associated needs along with their willingness to stay in the labour market well into their 70s, while the number of women – the traditional lay carers – available in the labour market has decreased in the US and elsewhere. This impacts on care-giving responsibilities and the provision of assistance and support by the family members, usually the women, who also contribute to the economy. The margins of ageing and caring are continually changing between work and private life. The aim of this book is to capture and conceptualise the complexity of informal care to older people at the intersection of work and life in different ‘care work’ contexts. It explores the flowing boundaries of caregiving across different care-giving societies. This book contains contributions from 25 experienced academics looking at different aspects of the junctions between the private and the public life, between professional and non-professional responsibilities, and between paid and non-paid work. The contents includes, for example, the negotiation of the public–private boundaries (chapter one), the dynamics of carework and mutigenerational care (chapters two and three), the multifaceted nature of work and care (chapter four), the development of care networks of paid and unpaid care-givers for looking after the weak seniors (chapter nine) and the economic and social roles in midlife in Britain (chapter 11). The chapters are articulate and well structured, with good links between them. Its style and content flow consistently, which makes it easy to find your way around and understand. This will be a useful research resource for those involved in academics (eg. researchers, postgraduate students) and in policy-making. Healthcare professionals may find it less helpful. Anne Martin-Matthews and Judith Phillips have a wealth of knowledge and expertise on this area and have skilfully drawn together others to produce this volume, which will help many readers to venture into these uncharted waters. Quality in Ageing Volume 9 Issue 4 December 2008 © Pavilion Journals (Brighton) Ltd 2008 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Quality in Ageing and Older Adults Pier Professional

Aging and Caring at the Intersection of Work and Home Life Blurring the boundaries

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Publisher
Pier Professional
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 by Pier Professional Limited
ISSN
1471-7794
eISSN
2042-8766
Publisher site
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Abstract

Book Review Reviewed by Panos Papanikolaou Research Fellow in the School of Nursing and Midwifery at Cardiff University Martin-Mathew A and Phillips J (Editors) London: Psychology Press ISBN: 978 0 80585 917 1 Two academics, well known for their research in the provision of lay care for older people, have edited this book. It reflects the increasing number of older people and their associated needs along with their willingness to stay in the labour market well into their 70s, while the number of women – the traditional lay carers – available in the labour market has decreased in the US and elsewhere. This impacts on care-giving responsibilities and the provision of assistance and support by the family members, usually the women, who also contribute to the economy. The margins of ageing and caring are continually changing between work and private life. The aim of this book is to capture and conceptualise the complexity of informal care to older people at the intersection of work and life in different ‘care work’ contexts. It explores the flowing boundaries of caregiving across different care-giving societies. This book contains contributions from 25 experienced academics looking at different aspects of the junctions between the private and the public life, between professional and non-professional responsibilities, and between paid and non-paid work. The contents includes, for example, the negotiation of the public–private boundaries (chapter one), the dynamics of carework and mutigenerational care (chapters two and three), the multifaceted nature of work and care (chapter four), the development of care networks of paid and unpaid care-givers for looking after the weak seniors (chapter nine) and the economic and social roles in midlife in Britain (chapter 11). The chapters are articulate and well structured, with good links between them. Its style and content flow consistently, which makes it easy to find your way around and understand. This will be a useful research resource for those involved in academics (eg. researchers, postgraduate students) and in policy-making. Healthcare professionals may find it less helpful. Anne Martin-Matthews and Judith Phillips have a wealth of knowledge and expertise on this area and have skilfully drawn together others to produce this volume, which will help many readers to venture into these uncharted waters. Quality in Ageing Volume 9 Issue 4 December 2008 © Pavilion Journals (Brighton) Ltd 2008

Journal

Quality in Ageing and Older AdultsPier Professional

Published: Dec 1, 2008

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