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Zarathustra's Blessed Isles: Before and After Great Politics

Zarathustra's Blessed Isles: Before and After Great Politics <p>Abstract:</p><p>This article considers the significance of the Blessed Isles in Nietzsche&apos;s <i>Thus Spoke Zarathustra</i>. They are the isolated locale to which Zarathustra and his fellow creators retreat in the Second Part of the book. I trace Zarathustra&apos;s Blessed Isles back to the ancient Greek paradisiacal afterlife of the <i>makarōn nēsoi</i> and frame them against Nietzsche&apos;s Platonic conception of philosophers as "commanders and legislators," but I argue that they represent something more like a modern Epicurean Garden. Ultimately, I suggest that Zarathustra&apos;s Epicurean impulse toward withdrawal (whether into a sequestered friendship community or mountain solitude) undermines his Platonic attempts at great politics.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

Zarathustra&apos;s Blessed Isles: Before and After Great Politics

The Journal of Nietzsche Studies , Volume 52 (1) – Apr 20, 2021

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1538-4594

Abstract

<p>Abstract:</p><p>This article considers the significance of the Blessed Isles in Nietzsche&apos;s <i>Thus Spoke Zarathustra</i>. They are the isolated locale to which Zarathustra and his fellow creators retreat in the Second Part of the book. I trace Zarathustra&apos;s Blessed Isles back to the ancient Greek paradisiacal afterlife of the <i>makarōn nēsoi</i> and frame them against Nietzsche&apos;s Platonic conception of philosophers as "commanders and legislators," but I argue that they represent something more like a modern Epicurean Garden. Ultimately, I suggest that Zarathustra&apos;s Epicurean impulse toward withdrawal (whether into a sequestered friendship community or mountain solitude) undermines his Platonic attempts at great politics.</p>

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Apr 20, 2021

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