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Wishes of the Heart: Walter Kaufmann, Karl Jaspers, and Disposition in Nietzsche Scholarship

Wishes of the Heart: Walter Kaufmann, Karl Jaspers, and Disposition in Nietzsche Scholarship : Walter Kaufmann, Karl Jaspers, and Disposition in Nietzsche Scholarship DAVID PICKUS I. Introduction: Whose Nietzsche? Without the efforts of Karl Jaspers and Walter Kaufmann, serious Nietzsche scholarship could have been set back at least a generation. Each wrote a "big book" on Nietzsche, one that not only offered a comprehensive overview of Nietzsche's philosophy but challenged the reader not to settle for anything less than a full Auseinandersetzung with Nietzsche's work and personality. This article argues that Jaspers's 1935 Nietzsche: Einführung in das Verständnis seines Philosophierens (translated as Nietzsche: An Introduction to the Understanding of His Philosophical Activity) and Kaufmann's 1950 Nietzsche: Philosopher, Psychologist, Antichrist need more study and that they should be examined in relation to each other.1 The vast scholarship on Nietzsche has grown to the point where an investigation of the underlying dynamics of the secondary literature is of pressing concern. After all, Nietzsche himself warned about putting any trust in professors in order to understand his thought. His opinion of academics who write monographs that do nothing more than rehash the ideas of others was, to put it mildly, blistering. Such scholars, for him, are "unbegeistert, ungespässig / unverwüstlich-mittelmässig / sans génie et http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

Wishes of the Heart: Walter Kaufmann, Karl Jaspers, and Disposition in Nietzsche Scholarship

The Journal of Nietzsche Studies , Volume 33 (1) – Jul 25, 2007

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by The Pennsylvania State University. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1538-4594
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Abstract

: Walter Kaufmann, Karl Jaspers, and Disposition in Nietzsche Scholarship DAVID PICKUS I. Introduction: Whose Nietzsche? Without the efforts of Karl Jaspers and Walter Kaufmann, serious Nietzsche scholarship could have been set back at least a generation. Each wrote a "big book" on Nietzsche, one that not only offered a comprehensive overview of Nietzsche's philosophy but challenged the reader not to settle for anything less than a full Auseinandersetzung with Nietzsche's work and personality. This article argues that Jaspers's 1935 Nietzsche: Einführung in das Verständnis seines Philosophierens (translated as Nietzsche: An Introduction to the Understanding of His Philosophical Activity) and Kaufmann's 1950 Nietzsche: Philosopher, Psychologist, Antichrist need more study and that they should be examined in relation to each other.1 The vast scholarship on Nietzsche has grown to the point where an investigation of the underlying dynamics of the secondary literature is of pressing concern. After all, Nietzsche himself warned about putting any trust in professors in order to understand his thought. His opinion of academics who write monographs that do nothing more than rehash the ideas of others was, to put it mildly, blistering. Such scholars, for him, are "unbegeistert, ungespässig / unverwüstlich-mittelmässig / sans génie et

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Jul 25, 2007

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