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What is Literature Worth? Narration, Cognition, and Ethics

What is Literature Worth? Narration, Cognition, and Ethics What is Literature Worth? Narration, Cognition, and Ethics nancy easterlin A Review of Liesbeth Korthals Altes’s Ethos and Narrative Interpretation: e Th Negotiation of Values in Fiction (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2015, xvi +326 pp., ISBN 978-0-8032-4836-6) A Review of Alexa Weik von Mossner’s Cosmopolitan Minds: Literature, Emotion, and the Transnational Imagination (Austin: University of Texas Press, 2014, 236 pp., ISBN 978-1-4773-0765-6) A Review of Erin James’s e Th Storyworld Accord: Econarratology and Post - colonial Narratives (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2015, xviii + 285 pp., ISBN 978-0-8032-4398-9) e et Th hical dimension of literary art—never, in fact, quite banished from cr iticism—is making a comeback. In this revived endeavor, cognitive cultural studies promises nuanced explanations of ethics in the production and use of literature, attendant as the field is to art behavior as both an exchange between minds and an internal process of emotion, mentation, and self-construction for writers, readers, teachers, and students. The three books under discussion here all take up, in one way or another, narrative ethics, and the authors employ different areas of cognitive research to support and elaborate their arguments. o Th ugh the present selections evince great variety in subject matter, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Interdisciplinary Literary Studies Penn State University Press

What is Literature Worth? Narration, Cognition, and Ethics

Interdisciplinary Literary Studies , Volume 18 (2) – May 19, 2016

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
2161-427X

Abstract

What is Literature Worth? Narration, Cognition, and Ethics nancy easterlin A Review of Liesbeth Korthals Altes’s Ethos and Narrative Interpretation: e Th Negotiation of Values in Fiction (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2015, xvi +326 pp., ISBN 978-0-8032-4836-6) A Review of Alexa Weik von Mossner’s Cosmopolitan Minds: Literature, Emotion, and the Transnational Imagination (Austin: University of Texas Press, 2014, 236 pp., ISBN 978-1-4773-0765-6) A Review of Erin James’s e Th Storyworld Accord: Econarratology and Post - colonial Narratives (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2015, xviii + 285 pp., ISBN 978-0-8032-4398-9) e et Th hical dimension of literary art—never, in fact, quite banished from cr iticism—is making a comeback. In this revived endeavor, cognitive cultural studies promises nuanced explanations of ethics in the production and use of literature, attendant as the field is to art behavior as both an exchange between minds and an internal process of emotion, mentation, and self-construction for writers, readers, teachers, and students. The three books under discussion here all take up, in one way or another, narrative ethics, and the authors employ different areas of cognitive research to support and elaborate their arguments. o Th ugh the present selections evince great variety in subject matter,

Journal

Interdisciplinary Literary StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: May 19, 2016

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