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"We Never Could Understand Why the Black Man Did Not Come to Us": Early African-Amerindian Subjectivities in Miguel Cabello Balboa’s Verdadera Descripción De La Provincia De Esmeraldas (1583)

"We Never Could Understand Why the Black Man Did Not Come to Us": Early African-Amerindian... "we never could understand why the black man did not come to us": early african-amerindian subjectivities in miguel cabello balboa's verdadera descripción de la provincia de esmeraldas (1583) Ruben A. Sánchez-Godoy 1 In the first chapter of The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double Consciousness, Paul Gilroy points out an interesting detail about Columbus's first trip to the Americas: Columbus' pilot, Pedro Nino, was also an African. The history of the Black Atlantic since then, continually crisscrossed by the movements of black people--not only as commodities but engaged in various struggles toward emancipation, autonomy, and citizenship--provides a means to reexamine the problems of nationality, location, identity, and historical memory.1 This assertion emerges as part of Gilroy's challenge to nationalistic and ethnic approaches that attempt to circumscribe the history of the African diaspora to the constitution of a particular identity. Beyond the debatable characterization of Pedro Nino as African, this remark expresses a position that is as suggestive as it is challenging.2 Gilroy proposes that the beginning of the black Atlantic is contemporaneous with the beginning of the modern European colonization of the Americas in 1492. Though his analyses remain mostly committed to ideas and vocabulary that emerge in the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Literature Studies Penn State University Press

"We Never Could Understand Why the Black Man Did Not Come to Us": Early African-Amerindian Subjectivities in Miguel Cabello Balboa’s Verdadera Descripción De La Provincia De Esmeraldas (1583)

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Penn State University Press
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Copyright © The Pennsylvania State University.
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Abstract

"we never could understand why the black man did not come to us": early african-amerindian subjectivities in miguel cabello balboa's verdadera descripción de la provincia de esmeraldas (1583) Ruben A. Sánchez-Godoy 1 In the first chapter of The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double Consciousness, Paul Gilroy points out an interesting detail about Columbus's first trip to the Americas: Columbus' pilot, Pedro Nino, was also an African. The history of the Black Atlantic since then, continually crisscrossed by the movements of black people--not only as commodities but engaged in various struggles toward emancipation, autonomy, and citizenship--provides a means to reexamine the problems of nationality, location, identity, and historical memory.1 This assertion emerges as part of Gilroy's challenge to nationalistic and ethnic approaches that attempt to circumscribe the history of the African diaspora to the constitution of a particular identity. Beyond the debatable characterization of Pedro Nino as African, this remark expresses a position that is as suggestive as it is challenging.2 Gilroy proposes that the beginning of the black Atlantic is contemporaneous with the beginning of the modern European colonization of the Americas in 1492. Though his analyses remain mostly committed to ideas and vocabulary that emerge in the

Journal

Comparative Literature StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: May 10, 2012

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