Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Wandering Beyond the Bounds: Nomadism, Health, and Self-Undermining

Wandering Beyond the Bounds: Nomadism, Health, and Self-Undermining 040 coutinho (70-88) 10/27/04 12:49 PM Page 70 Wandering Beyond the Bounds: Nomadism, Health, and Self-Undermining Steve Coutinho and Geir Sigurdsson In the Northern Darkness there is a fish whose name is Khaon. Khaon is so vast— I do not know how many thousands of leagues. It transforms into a bird whose name is Phoeng. The back of Phoeng measures I don’t know how many thou- sands of leagues. It becomes aroused and flies off, its wings like clouds draped across the sky. When the oceans begin their revolutions, this bird sets off for the Southern darkness, the lake of Tian (“heaven/nature”). —Zhuangzi o begins the migration of the great oneiric beast, and so begins the first chap- Ster of the Daoist classic, Zhuangzi. The chapter itself is entitled Xiao Yao You, which translates as “Free and Easy Wandering.” But Zhuangzi’s wandering is more than just an easeful saunter: it is a wandering beyond the boundaries, into the distance [yao], not just the horizons, but also the distance above. From this higher vantage point, there are new boundaries, new delineations: new “things” emerge; old “things” vanish. Boundaries blur, and blurrings become boundaries. One rises beyond one’s situation: the water http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

Wandering Beyond the Bounds: Nomadism, Health, and Self-Undermining

Loading next page...
 
/lp/penn-state-university-press/wandering-beyond-the-bounds-nomadism-health-and-self-undermining-4x0l23v0mV
Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 The Friedrich Nietzsche Society.
ISSN
1538-4594

Abstract

040 coutinho (70-88) 10/27/04 12:49 PM Page 70 Wandering Beyond the Bounds: Nomadism, Health, and Self-Undermining Steve Coutinho and Geir Sigurdsson In the Northern Darkness there is a fish whose name is Khaon. Khaon is so vast— I do not know how many thousands of leagues. It transforms into a bird whose name is Phoeng. The back of Phoeng measures I don’t know how many thou- sands of leagues. It becomes aroused and flies off, its wings like clouds draped across the sky. When the oceans begin their revolutions, this bird sets off for the Southern darkness, the lake of Tian (“heaven/nature”). —Zhuangzi o begins the migration of the great oneiric beast, and so begins the first chap- Ster of the Daoist classic, Zhuangzi. The chapter itself is entitled Xiao Yao You, which translates as “Free and Easy Wandering.” But Zhuangzi’s wandering is more than just an easeful saunter: it is a wandering beyond the boundaries, into the distance [yao], not just the horizons, but also the distance above. From this higher vantage point, there are new boundaries, new delineations: new “things” emerge; old “things” vanish. Boundaries blur, and blurrings become boundaries. One rises beyond one’s situation: the water

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Nov 29, 2004

There are no references for this article.