Utopia as a Tool for Change: A Review of Publications on Utopia in France (2016 and the First Semester of 2017)

Utopia as a Tool for Change: A Review of Publications on Utopia in France (2016 and the First... Utopia as a Tool for Change: A Review of Publications on Utopia in France (2016 and the First Semester of 2017) Fátima Vieira   Thomas More and His Utopia “I prithee, honest friend, lend me thy hand / To help me up; as for my coming down, / Let me alone, I’ll look to that myself,” says Thomas More to his executioner while mounting the scaffold on July 6, 1535. We are read- ing from Sir Thomas More (act 5, scene 4), that complicated text that testi- es to the collabor fi ative nature of Elizabethan drama. Supposedly written by Anthony Munday and Henry Chettle, and benefiting from the contribu- tion of Thomas Heywood, Thomas Dekker, and William Shakespeare, the play celebrates Thomas More’s sense of humor—a facet that is sometimes forgotten but which Marie-Claire Phélippeau, in her new biography of the English humanist (Thomas More, 2016), intentionally highlights. Phélippeau must have felt the huge responsibility of publishing a biography of the saint in the year commemorating five hundred years since the publication of Thomas More’s Utopia, mainly because it was not the first time that the life of the English humanist was being disclosed to the public: in fact, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Utopian Studies Penn State University Press

Utopia as a Tool for Change: A Review of Publications on Utopia in France (2016 and the First Semester of 2017)

Utopian Studies, Volume 28 (3) – Feb 17, 2018

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Utopian Studies
ISSN
2154-9648

Abstract

Utopia as a Tool for Change: A Review of Publications on Utopia in France (2016 and the First Semester of 2017) Fátima Vieira   Thomas More and His Utopia “I prithee, honest friend, lend me thy hand / To help me up; as for my coming down, / Let me alone, I’ll look to that myself,” says Thomas More to his executioner while mounting the scaffold on July 6, 1535. We are read- ing from Sir Thomas More (act 5, scene 4), that complicated text that testi- es to the collabor fi ative nature of Elizabethan drama. Supposedly written by Anthony Munday and Henry Chettle, and benefiting from the contribu- tion of Thomas Heywood, Thomas Dekker, and William Shakespeare, the play celebrates Thomas More’s sense of humor—a facet that is sometimes forgotten but which Marie-Claire Phélippeau, in her new biography of the English humanist (Thomas More, 2016), intentionally highlights. Phélippeau must have felt the huge responsibility of publishing a biography of the saint in the year commemorating five hundred years since the publication of Thomas More’s Utopia, mainly because it was not the first time that the life of the English humanist was being disclosed to the public: in fact,

Journal

Utopian StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Feb 17, 2018

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