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Untergang und Übergang : The Tragic Descent of Socrates and Zarathustra

Untergang und Übergang : The Tragic Descent of Socrates and Zarathustra : The Tragic Descent of Socrates and Zarathustra I. Through meticulous scholarship and innovative interpretation, Robert Gooding-Williams argues that we must approach the question of modernism historically, especially in relation to the ancients. As the title alone, Zarathustra's Dionysian Modernism (ZDM), suggests, we must revisit Dionysus in order to understand Zarathustra. The striking juxtaposition of ancient and modern in the title invites us to ask: How does Zarathustra relate to Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, and Greek tragedy? The young Nietzsche's esteem for the Greeks can hardly be overstated; he refers to the Greeks as "our luminous guides" (BT 23) and writes of his desire to "stimulate among the students an interest in the careful interpretation of Aristotle and Plato."1 Above all, Plato's Socrates held a pivotal position for Nietzsche throughout his life. Even in later works such as Z, Nietzsche continues to wrestle with Plato and Socrates, to esteem them and evoke them while simultaneously questioning them. One of the particular strengths of Gooding-Williams's book lies in the way it relates Nietzsche to myriad figures from the history of philosophy as well as to recent trends in analytical philosophy. But if we challenge the book's assumptions on Plato and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

Untergang und Übergang : The Tragic Descent of Socrates and Zarathustra

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by The Pennsylvania State University. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1538-4594
Publisher site
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Abstract

: The Tragic Descent of Socrates and Zarathustra I. Through meticulous scholarship and innovative interpretation, Robert Gooding-Williams argues that we must approach the question of modernism historically, especially in relation to the ancients. As the title alone, Zarathustra's Dionysian Modernism (ZDM), suggests, we must revisit Dionysus in order to understand Zarathustra. The striking juxtaposition of ancient and modern in the title invites us to ask: How does Zarathustra relate to Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, and Greek tragedy? The young Nietzsche's esteem for the Greeks can hardly be overstated; he refers to the Greeks as "our luminous guides" (BT 23) and writes of his desire to "stimulate among the students an interest in the careful interpretation of Aristotle and Plato."1 Above all, Plato's Socrates held a pivotal position for Nietzsche throughout his life. Even in later works such as Z, Nietzsche continues to wrestle with Plato and Socrates, to esteem them and evoke them while simultaneously questioning them. One of the particular strengths of Gooding-Williams's book lies in the way it relates Nietzsche to myriad figures from the history of philosophy as well as to recent trends in analytical philosophy. But if we challenge the book's assumptions on Plato and

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Dec 6, 2007

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