Twilight of the Living Dead?

Twilight of the Living Dead? A PEGS Journal VOL. 11 NO. 2 THE GOOD SOCIETY "The art of governing well has to be learned."--Walter Lippmann Committee on the Political Economy of the Good Society Symposium: The Constitution of the Living Dead: Binding the Present to the Past Rogers M. Smith The longer I have taught constitutional law, a span now approaching a quarter of a century, the stranger I have found the whole enterprise of governing via a written constitution, especially a hard-to-amend written constitution with a powerful constitutional court like that of the United States. Yet in that same quarter century, what was once a unique governmental structure has (with great variations) come to be widely imitated throughout the world, in national, regionally transnational, and incipiently global institutions. Ironically, many of those same developments clearly also have the potential to transform basic features of the American constitutional system rather radically in the decades ahead, perhaps by incorporating elements of it into one or more transnational governments of various sorts. Hence I am simultaneously increasingly struck by our system's peculiarity, impressed by its exemplary success, and piqued by the growing possibility that in at least some important respects it may not long endure. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Good Society Penn State University Press

Twilight of the Living Dead?

The Good Society, Volume 11 (2) – Mar 12, 2002

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 The Good Society.
ISSN
1538-9731
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A PEGS Journal VOL. 11 NO. 2 THE GOOD SOCIETY "The art of governing well has to be learned."--Walter Lippmann Committee on the Political Economy of the Good Society Symposium: The Constitution of the Living Dead: Binding the Present to the Past Rogers M. Smith The longer I have taught constitutional law, a span now approaching a quarter of a century, the stranger I have found the whole enterprise of governing via a written constitution, especially a hard-to-amend written constitution with a powerful constitutional court like that of the United States. Yet in that same quarter century, what was once a unique governmental structure has (with great variations) come to be widely imitated throughout the world, in national, regionally transnational, and incipiently global institutions. Ironically, many of those same developments clearly also have the potential to transform basic features of the American constitutional system rather radically in the decades ahead, perhaps by incorporating elements of it into one or more transnational governments of various sorts. Hence I am simultaneously increasingly struck by our system's peculiarity, impressed by its exemplary success, and piqued by the growing possibility that in at least some important respects it may not long endure.

Journal

The Good SocietyPenn State University Press

Published: Mar 12, 2002

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