Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Voice of Shaw

The Voice of Shaw degrading fury, and then exhaustion and loathing.'' As to end-of-war ``revenges and humiliations and plunderings, these may be left to be snatched at by the ignoble wretches who traffic in their country's blood for such satisfactions.'' It is no wonder that war bureaucrats wanted to keep him out of print and, soon, peace bureaucrats as well. While the victors were largely bent on plundering the losers, from colonies and border realignments to coal and iron, Shaw in his unpublished French preface to Peace Conference Hints declares that the ``moral cleaningup after war'' was ``far more important than the material restorations. . . . The poisoning of the human soul by hatred, the darkening of the human mind by lies, and the hardening of the human heart by slaughter and destruction and starvation, are evils that spread and fester long after the guns have stopped.'' His words, although silenced to his desk drawers, are no less valuable after further wars but no less likely to be ignored. ``The moral is that hegemonies are impossible,'' he closes, ``and attempts at them [are] certain to end in armament races and finally in war. There was a time when this did not http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png SHAW The Annual of Bernard Shaw Studies Penn State University Press

Loading next page...
 
/lp/penn-state-university-press/the-voice-of-shaw-t8qpwb8pZl
Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 The Pennsylvania State University. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1529-1480
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

degrading fury, and then exhaustion and loathing.'' As to end-of-war ``revenges and humiliations and plunderings, these may be left to be snatched at by the ignoble wretches who traffic in their country's blood for such satisfactions.'' It is no wonder that war bureaucrats wanted to keep him out of print and, soon, peace bureaucrats as well. While the victors were largely bent on plundering the losers, from colonies and border realignments to coal and iron, Shaw in his unpublished French preface to Peace Conference Hints declares that the ``moral cleaningup after war'' was ``far more important than the material restorations. . . . The poisoning of the human soul by hatred, the darkening of the human mind by lies, and the hardening of the human heart by slaughter and destruction and starvation, are evils that spread and fester long after the guns have stopped.'' His words, although silenced to his desk drawers, are no less valuable after further wars but no less likely to be ignored. ``The moral is that hegemonies are impossible,'' he closes, ``and attempts at them [are] certain to end in armament races and finally in war. There was a time when this did not

Journal

SHAW The Annual of Bernard Shaw StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Oct 22, 2007

There are no references for this article.