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The Summoned Self Under Siege: Shaw, Ricoeur, Poetics of Personhood in Too True to be Good

The Summoned Self Under Siege: Shaw, Ricoeur, Poetics of Personhood in Too True to be Good Howard Ira Einsohn THE SUMMONED SELF UNDER SIEGE: SHAW, RICOEUR, AND THE POETICS OF PERSONHOOD IN TOO TRUE TO BE GOOD The ``summoned self '' is a concept thematized in the corpus of Paul Ricoeur, the French philosopher of hermeneutical phenomenology and sometime biblical exegete with whom Shaw shares several affinities. Conceived narrowly, the notion signifies any individual, group, or community that responds affirmatively--directly or indirectly--to the call latent in the metaphoric structures of the Bible that project alternative but potentially redemptive ways of being in the world.1 For Ricoeur, the proximate sites are the extravagantly hyperbolic parables, sayings, and aphorisms associated with the life and teaching of the Nazarene Jesus that converge on the idea of an ``economy of the gift.'' This type of economy summons us, both individually and collectively, to treat others with an exuberant (though not unlimited) solicitude in the manner that Jesus lived and taught. That is to say, with no thought of a quid pro quo, we are enjoined to give and give generously to the commonweal, even if such gifting incurs a cost, because life and life-supporting systems have been given to us. Conceived more broadly, the notion of a summoned http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png SHAW The Annual of Bernard Shaw Studies Penn State University Press

The Summoned Self Under Siege: Shaw, Ricoeur, Poetics of Personhood in Too True to be Good

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Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The Pennsylvania State University
ISSN
1529-1480
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Abstract

Howard Ira Einsohn THE SUMMONED SELF UNDER SIEGE: SHAW, RICOEUR, AND THE POETICS OF PERSONHOOD IN TOO TRUE TO BE GOOD The ``summoned self '' is a concept thematized in the corpus of Paul Ricoeur, the French philosopher of hermeneutical phenomenology and sometime biblical exegete with whom Shaw shares several affinities. Conceived narrowly, the notion signifies any individual, group, or community that responds affirmatively--directly or indirectly--to the call latent in the metaphoric structures of the Bible that project alternative but potentially redemptive ways of being in the world.1 For Ricoeur, the proximate sites are the extravagantly hyperbolic parables, sayings, and aphorisms associated with the life and teaching of the Nazarene Jesus that converge on the idea of an ``economy of the gift.'' This type of economy summons us, both individually and collectively, to treat others with an exuberant (though not unlimited) solicitude in the manner that Jesus lived and taught. That is to say, with no thought of a quid pro quo, we are enjoined to give and give generously to the commonweal, even if such gifting incurs a cost, because life and life-supporting systems have been given to us. Conceived more broadly, the notion of a summoned

Journal

SHAW The Annual of Bernard Shaw StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Dec 24, 2008

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