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The Private and Public Appeal of Self-Fashioning

The Private and Public Appeal of Self-Fashioning The Private and Public Appeal of Self-Fashioning elf-creation, or self-fashioning, already with a long and impressive pedigree running from the "medical" models of the Ancient Greeks and Romans through the "aesthetic" models of Nietzsche, Foucault, and Rorty (among others), has made its way into both pop-philosophy and pop-psychology, with the assumption that such terms are meaningful, that such actions are possible, and that (with insight and effort) a blueprint for an original, self-created-work-ofart-self can be drafted and implemented. What's more, there is an assumption that self-fashioning is something good, that it is something that we ought to (or at least do) value. Nietzsche is occasionally invoked to lend some philosophical weight to programs of self-creation. This is not without some support. "We, however, want to become those we are--human beings who are new, unique, incomparable, who give himself or herself laws, who create himself or herself " (GS, 335).1 In a comment on Goethe, Nietzsche says that he sought "totality" and to that end "he disciplined himself to wholeness, he created himself (TI, "Skirmishes," 49)."2 Nehamas complicates such a picture by denying that Nietzsche's discussion of self-creation can be attributed to him as "a positive view of human http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

The Private and Public Appeal of Self-Fashioning

The Journal of Nietzsche Studies , Volume 31 (1) – Jun 14, 2006

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 by The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1538-4594
Publisher site
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Abstract

The Private and Public Appeal of Self-Fashioning elf-creation, or self-fashioning, already with a long and impressive pedigree running from the "medical" models of the Ancient Greeks and Romans through the "aesthetic" models of Nietzsche, Foucault, and Rorty (among others), has made its way into both pop-philosophy and pop-psychology, with the assumption that such terms are meaningful, that such actions are possible, and that (with insight and effort) a blueprint for an original, self-created-work-ofart-self can be drafted and implemented. What's more, there is an assumption that self-fashioning is something good, that it is something that we ought to (or at least do) value. Nietzsche is occasionally invoked to lend some philosophical weight to programs of self-creation. This is not without some support. "We, however, want to become those we are--human beings who are new, unique, incomparable, who give himself or herself laws, who create himself or herself " (GS, 335).1 In a comment on Goethe, Nietzsche says that he sought "totality" and to that end "he disciplined himself to wholeness, he created himself (TI, "Skirmishes," 49)."2 Nehamas complicates such a picture by denying that Nietzsche's discussion of self-creation can be attributed to him as "a positive view of human

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Jun 14, 2006

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