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The Playwright and the Prizefighter: Bernard Shaw and Gene Tunney

The Playwright and the Prizefighter: Bernard Shaw and Gene Tunney I would like to share with you the story of my father's close friendship with George Bernard Shaw and how they met through the sport of boxing. Their friendship continued throughout the last quarter of Shaw's long life. The two men's lives and interests were converging even before they met in December 1928. Bernard Shaw wrote a lecture in London in 1884 on Shakespeare's comparatively unnoticed play, Troilus and Cressida, saying he thought it marked the crossroad in all of Shakespeare's plays. Forty-four years later, Gene Tunney, then heavyweight boxing champion of the world, was invited to give a lecture at Yale University on Shakespeare. Without notes he spoke for forty-five minutes on Shakespeare's play, Troilus and Cressida. Soon after World War II, Bernard Shaw wrote to a friend in America--a fellow vegetarian named Curt Freshel: "I have not been given to close personal friendships, as you know, and Gene Tunney is among the very few for whom I have established a warm affection. I enjoy his company as I have that of few men." Gene Tunney once wrote: "If for nothing else, I am grateful to the profession of boxing for enabling me to know the witty, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png SHAW The Annual of Bernard Shaw Studies Penn State University Press

The Playwright and the Prizefighter: Bernard Shaw and Gene Tunney

SHAW The Annual of Bernard Shaw Studies , Volume 23 (1)

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 The Pennsylvania State University
ISSN
1529-1480
Publisher site
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Abstract

I would like to share with you the story of my father's close friendship with George Bernard Shaw and how they met through the sport of boxing. Their friendship continued throughout the last quarter of Shaw's long life. The two men's lives and interests were converging even before they met in December 1928. Bernard Shaw wrote a lecture in London in 1884 on Shakespeare's comparatively unnoticed play, Troilus and Cressida, saying he thought it marked the crossroad in all of Shakespeare's plays. Forty-four years later, Gene Tunney, then heavyweight boxing champion of the world, was invited to give a lecture at Yale University on Shakespeare. Without notes he spoke for forty-five minutes on Shakespeare's play, Troilus and Cressida. Soon after World War II, Bernard Shaw wrote to a friend in America--a fellow vegetarian named Curt Freshel: "I have not been given to close personal friendships, as you know, and Gene Tunney is among the very few for whom I have established a warm affection. I enjoy his company as I have that of few men." Gene Tunney once wrote: "If for nothing else, I am grateful to the profession of boxing for enabling me to know the witty,

Journal

SHAW The Annual of Bernard Shaw StudiesPenn State University Press

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