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The Nick of Time: Politics, Evolution, and the Untimely (review)

The Nick of Time: Politics, Evolution, and the Untimely (review) BOOK REVIEWS 69 Elizabeth Grosz. The Nick of Time: Politics, Evolution, and the Untimely. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 2004. 314 + viii pp. NICKOLAS PAPPAS The future was not where it should have been. Newtonian mechanism encouraged fantasies of time’s movement “forward” to Utopia, nature as indirect as Rube Goldberg’s apparatuses, but also just as inexorable, and just as surely rigged to gratify human wishes. Now that historical processes no longer inspire such faith, political activism needs new ontological underpinnings (2–3). Conservatives may project the recent past simplistically ahead, while fundamentalists yearn to tear past and present down like two giant Buddha statues in the Afghan desert (257). But if some new future remains the object of one’s hopes, asks Elizabeth Grosz, and yet is not guaranteed to come, then how does the activist go about producing it? Whatever the new foundation is, it ought to serve a “politics of the oppressed” (119), carried out by “feminists, antiracists, and political activists of all kinds” (186). The prolegomenon to future pol- itics should illuminate (1) “how we conceptualize the future and engender it through political and social action” (242), and (2) what the human body must be like, to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

The Nick of Time: Politics, Evolution, and the Untimely (review)

The Journal of Nietzsche Studies , Volume 31 (1) – Jun 14, 2006

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1538-4594

Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS 69 Elizabeth Grosz. The Nick of Time: Politics, Evolution, and the Untimely. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 2004. 314 + viii pp. NICKOLAS PAPPAS The future was not where it should have been. Newtonian mechanism encouraged fantasies of time’s movement “forward” to Utopia, nature as indirect as Rube Goldberg’s apparatuses, but also just as inexorable, and just as surely rigged to gratify human wishes. Now that historical processes no longer inspire such faith, political activism needs new ontological underpinnings (2–3). Conservatives may project the recent past simplistically ahead, while fundamentalists yearn to tear past and present down like two giant Buddha statues in the Afghan desert (257). But if some new future remains the object of one’s hopes, asks Elizabeth Grosz, and yet is not guaranteed to come, then how does the activist go about producing it? Whatever the new foundation is, it ought to serve a “politics of the oppressed” (119), carried out by “feminists, antiracists, and political activists of all kinds” (186). The prolegomenon to future pol- itics should illuminate (1) “how we conceptualize the future and engender it through political and social action” (242), and (2) what the human body must be like, to

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Jun 14, 2006

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