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The Innocence of Victimhood Versus the “Innocence of Becoming”: Nietzsche, 9/11, and the “Falling Man”

The Innocence of Victimhood Versus the “Innocence of Becoming”: Nietzsche, 9/11, and the... The Innocence of Victimhood Versus the “Innocence of Becoming” Nietzsche, 9/11, and the “Falling Man” JOANNE FAULKNER In the most photographed and videotaped day in the history of the world, the images of people jumping were the only images that became, by consensus, taboo—the only images from which Americans were proud to avert their eyes. —Tom Junod, “The Falling Man,” Esquire Magazine , September 3, 2003 t would seem that there is very little about the events of the September 11, I2001, that has not already been said or imagined. Our understanding of these events, and especially the attacks on the Twin Towers, has been overdetermined by the seemingly endless repetition of (by now) iconic images: of planes perfo- rating the clear, tranquil surface of those seemingly impenetrable buildings and thus opening a rupture in the Western consciousness, the reparation of which is not yet in sight. Other images also populate the post-9/11 memory: images of disbelief, of grief, and of bravery—especially with respect to the members of the New York Fire Department, who rose to the occasion of providing a sense of American resilience and fortitude, thus representing a possible future after the catastrophe. These images played a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

The Innocence of Victimhood Versus the “Innocence of Becoming”: Nietzsche, 9/11, and the “Falling Man”

The Journal of Nietzsche Studies , Volume 35 (1) – Nov 28, 2008

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1538-4594

Abstract

The Innocence of Victimhood Versus the “Innocence of Becoming” Nietzsche, 9/11, and the “Falling Man” JOANNE FAULKNER In the most photographed and videotaped day in the history of the world, the images of people jumping were the only images that became, by consensus, taboo—the only images from which Americans were proud to avert their eyes. —Tom Junod, “The Falling Man,” Esquire Magazine , September 3, 2003 t would seem that there is very little about the events of the September 11, I2001, that has not already been said or imagined. Our understanding of these events, and especially the attacks on the Twin Towers, has been overdetermined by the seemingly endless repetition of (by now) iconic images: of planes perfo- rating the clear, tranquil surface of those seemingly impenetrable buildings and thus opening a rupture in the Western consciousness, the reparation of which is not yet in sight. Other images also populate the post-9/11 memory: images of disbelief, of grief, and of bravery—especially with respect to the members of the New York Fire Department, who rose to the occasion of providing a sense of American resilience and fortitude, thus representing a possible future after the catastrophe. These images played a

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Nov 28, 2008

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