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The Etnogenez Project: Ideology and Science Fiction in Putin’s Russia

The Etnogenez Project: Ideology and Science Fiction in Putin’s Russia abstract: This essay examines the Etnogenez series of science fiction and fantasy novels. Launched in 2009 by the media producer, “political technologist,” and Kremlin insider Konstantin Rykov, Etnogenez has enjoyed truly phenomenal success, developing into one of the most ambitious publishing projects of the post-Soviet period. At present it numbers more than fifty works, which circulate in millions of copies and additionally are broadly disseminated on the Internet and as e-books, audiobooks, and podcasts. There are Etnogenez fan clubs, computer games, and dozens of Internet discussion groups. Although the novels in the series differ widely in their plots and subjects, and are written in a variety of different science fiction genres, all of them are loosely inspired by the work of the historian and geographer Lev Nikolaevich Gumilev, in particular his theories of ethnogenesis (from which the project takes its name), passionarnost ’, and Eurasianism. The essay explores the powerful resonances between the Etnogenez project, the Gumilevian legacy, and the leading political and social narratives of Putin’s Russia. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Utopian Studies Penn State University Press

The Etnogenez Project: Ideology and Science Fiction in Putin’s Russia

Utopian Studies , Volume 27 (1) – Mar 11, 2016

The Etnogenez Project: Ideology and Science Fiction in Putin’s Russia


Mark Bassin and Irina Kotkina abstract This essay examines the Etnogenez series of science fiction and fantasy novels. Launched in 2009 by the media producer, "political technologist," and Kremlin insider Konstantin Rykov, Etnogenez has enjoyed truly phenomenal success, developing into one of the most ambitious publishing projects of the post-Soviet period. At present it numbers more than fifty works, which circulate in millions of copies and additionally are broadly disseminated on the Internet and as e-books, audiobooks, and podcasts. There are Etnogenez fan clubs, computer games, and dozens of Internet discussion groups. Although the novels in the series differ widely in their plots and subjects, and are written in a variety of different science fiction genres, all of them are loosely inspired by the work of the historian and geographer Lev Nikolaevich Gumilev, in particular his theories of ethnogenesis (from which the project takes its name), passionarnost', and Eurasianism. The essay explores the powerful resonances between the Etnogenez project, the Gumilevian legacy, and the leading political and social narratives of Putin's Russia. Utopian Studies, Vol. 27, No. 1, 2016 Copyright © 2016. The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA Utopian Studies 27.1 keywords: Russian science fiction, Etnogenez, Eurasianism, Lev Gumilev, Konstantin Rykov In her recent book We Modern People, Anindita Banerjee suggests that in prerevolutionary Russia, science fiction substantially shaped the way people thought about and understood modernity and modernization.1 This same sort of connection between the structures of science and social life is still with us in the present day. Over the past decade, the proportion of science fiction books compared with other publications in Russia has increased considerably; indeed, according to some reports as many as five hundred science fiction novels are published every year in Russia.2 And as was the...
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Penn State University Press
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Copyright © Society for Utopian Studies
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2154-9648
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Abstract

abstract: This essay examines the Etnogenez series of science fiction and fantasy novels. Launched in 2009 by the media producer, “political technologist,” and Kremlin insider Konstantin Rykov, Etnogenez has enjoyed truly phenomenal success, developing into one of the most ambitious publishing projects of the post-Soviet period. At present it numbers more than fifty works, which circulate in millions of copies and additionally are broadly disseminated on the Internet and as e-books, audiobooks, and podcasts. There are Etnogenez fan clubs, computer games, and dozens of Internet discussion groups. Although the novels in the series differ widely in their plots and subjects, and are written in a variety of different science fiction genres, all of them are loosely inspired by the work of the historian and geographer Lev Nikolaevich Gumilev, in particular his theories of ethnogenesis (from which the project takes its name), passionarnost ’, and Eurasianism. The essay explores the powerful resonances between the Etnogenez project, the Gumilevian legacy, and the leading political and social narratives of Putin’s Russia.

Journal

Utopian StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Mar 11, 2016

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