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The Chronology of Lydgate's Chaucer References

The Chronology of Lydgate's Chaucer References by John Lydgate gives no direct evidence of having known or known of Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales until about 1421­22, when Lydgate wrote the prologue to his Siege of Thebes. In casting his narration as an additional new tale--or recasting it, if, as has been suggested, the prologue was written after the narration proper was finished--Lydgate coins the phrase "Canterbury talys" (18), metri causa perhaps, the only earlier reference being Chaucer's own slightly differing "the tales of Caunterbury," in the prose Retractions (1086).1 Lydgate here makes particular reference to the tales of "the Cook þe millere and the Reve" (28), "the pardowner, beerdlees al his Chyn" (33), and "the frere" (35).2 He alludes indefinitely to the variety of other tale-tellings: Some of desport some of moralité, Some of knyghthode loue and gentillesse, And some also of parfit holynesse, And some also in soth of Ribaudye. (22­25) And he makes detailed reuse of various particulars from the General Prologue, especially the immediately exigent rules of the storytelling contest and the part in it of the Host (whom Lydgate does not call by the personal name Chaucer assigned him only the once, in the Cook's Tale headlink [1.4358]). In the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Chaucer Review Penn State University Press

The Chronology of Lydgate's Chaucer References

The Chaucer Review , Volume 38 (3) – Nov 3, 2004

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Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 by The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1528-4204
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Abstract

by John Lydgate gives no direct evidence of having known or known of Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales until about 1421­22, when Lydgate wrote the prologue to his Siege of Thebes. In casting his narration as an additional new tale--or recasting it, if, as has been suggested, the prologue was written after the narration proper was finished--Lydgate coins the phrase "Canterbury talys" (18), metri causa perhaps, the only earlier reference being Chaucer's own slightly differing "the tales of Caunterbury," in the prose Retractions (1086).1 Lydgate here makes particular reference to the tales of "the Cook þe millere and the Reve" (28), "the pardowner, beerdlees al his Chyn" (33), and "the frere" (35).2 He alludes indefinitely to the variety of other tale-tellings: Some of desport some of moralité, Some of knyghthode loue and gentillesse, And some also of parfit holynesse, And some also in soth of Ribaudye. (22­25) And he makes detailed reuse of various particulars from the General Prologue, especially the immediately exigent rules of the storytelling contest and the part in it of the Host (whom Lydgate does not call by the personal name Chaucer assigned him only the once, in the Cook's Tale headlink [1.4358]). In the

Journal

The Chaucer ReviewPenn State University Press

Published: Nov 3, 2004

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