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Surrealism and the Art of Crime (review)

Surrealism and the Art of Crime (review) BOOK REVIEWS of popular culture, make this book a model for transnational comparative studies of colonial and postcolonial writers. Kerry L. Johnson Merrimack College Surrealism and the Art of Crime. By Jonathan P. Eburne. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2008. 344 pp. Cloth $35.00. The accounts of Parisian surrealism of the 1920s and 1930s in histories and critical studies I first encountered as a student some forty-five years ago were typically of two kinds. Some traced its impact on literature, theater, graphic arts, and visual arts from photography to film. Others linked it as a movement or aesthetic to politics, philosophy, and psychoanalysis. In France, Maurice Nadeau's 1944 History of Surrealism and Jean-Paul Sartre's 1948 What is Literature? were among early postwar assessments of surrealism's evolving role within an avant-garde whose revolutionary ambitions spawned detractors as well as supporters. Studies since the 1966 death of the initial group's leader, André Breton, have fashioned a more complex object of study by tracing itineraries of dissidents who moved across the group in its various configurations. Jonathan P. Eburne's remarkable new book is a reminder that there is still much to be said about surrealism some eight-five years after the 1924 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Literature Studies Penn State University Press

Surrealism and the Art of Crime (review)

Comparative Literature Studies , Volume 47 (1) – Mar 31, 2010

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Penn State University Press
ISSN
1528-4212
Publisher site
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Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS of popular culture, make this book a model for transnational comparative studies of colonial and postcolonial writers. Kerry L. Johnson Merrimack College Surrealism and the Art of Crime. By Jonathan P. Eburne. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2008. 344 pp. Cloth $35.00. The accounts of Parisian surrealism of the 1920s and 1930s in histories and critical studies I first encountered as a student some forty-five years ago were typically of two kinds. Some traced its impact on literature, theater, graphic arts, and visual arts from photography to film. Others linked it as a movement or aesthetic to politics, philosophy, and psychoanalysis. In France, Maurice Nadeau's 1944 History of Surrealism and Jean-Paul Sartre's 1948 What is Literature? were among early postwar assessments of surrealism's evolving role within an avant-garde whose revolutionary ambitions spawned detractors as well as supporters. Studies since the 1966 death of the initial group's leader, André Breton, have fashioned a more complex object of study by tracing itineraries of dissidents who moved across the group in its various configurations. Jonathan P. Eburne's remarkable new book is a reminder that there is still much to be said about surrealism some eight-five years after the 1924

Journal

Comparative Literature StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Mar 31, 2010

There are no references for this article.