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Strange Attractions: Sibling Love Triangles in Faulkner's Absalom, Absalom! and Balzac's La Fille aux yeux d'or

Strange Attractions: Sibling Love Triangles in Faulkner's Absalom, Absalom! and Balzac's La Fille... David Walter Introduction Before he wrote The Sound and the Fury, the young William Faulkner was trying to be the Honoré de Balzac of the South. He had a plan to reproduce Balzac's fictional world in which characters and settings reappeared from story to story, and he was making works that closely emulated Balzac's style. Jacques Pothier describes how Faulkner, under the close hand of his literary mentor Phil Stone, conceived his first Yoknapatawpha fictions: After Soldier's Pay and Mosquitoes, Stone enthusiastically encouraged Faulkner to get started on a double novel which he must have regarded as the promising beginning of a Southern "Human Comedy." A Sartoris book and a Snopes book must have been started at the same time. . . . They were Flags in the Dust, and the manuscript cryptically entitled "Father Abraham." Scenes of town-life in one book would have been offset by scenes of rural life in the second one, just as Balzac contrasts "Scenes of Parisian Life" with "Scenes of Provincial Life."1 Critics have published comprehensive articles discussing the titles, characters, and storylines that Faulkner specifically borrowed from Balzac during this early, imitative phase.2 But when it comes to exploring how Balzac's http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Literature Studies Penn State University Press

Strange Attractions: Sibling Love Triangles in Faulkner's Absalom, Absalom! and Balzac's La Fille aux yeux d'or

Comparative Literature Studies , Volume 44 (3) – Dec 6, 2007

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by The Pennsylvania State University. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1528-4212
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Abstract

David Walter Introduction Before he wrote The Sound and the Fury, the young William Faulkner was trying to be the Honoré de Balzac of the South. He had a plan to reproduce Balzac's fictional world in which characters and settings reappeared from story to story, and he was making works that closely emulated Balzac's style. Jacques Pothier describes how Faulkner, under the close hand of his literary mentor Phil Stone, conceived his first Yoknapatawpha fictions: After Soldier's Pay and Mosquitoes, Stone enthusiastically encouraged Faulkner to get started on a double novel which he must have regarded as the promising beginning of a Southern "Human Comedy." A Sartoris book and a Snopes book must have been started at the same time. . . . They were Flags in the Dust, and the manuscript cryptically entitled "Father Abraham." Scenes of town-life in one book would have been offset by scenes of rural life in the second one, just as Balzac contrasts "Scenes of Parisian Life" with "Scenes of Provincial Life."1 Critics have published comprehensive articles discussing the titles, characters, and storylines that Faulkner specifically borrowed from Balzac during this early, imitative phase.2 But when it comes to exploring how Balzac's

Journal

Comparative Literature StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Dec 6, 2007

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